Humans use Optokinetic Eye Movements to Track Waypoints for Steering

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http://hdl.handle.net/10138/313856

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Lappi , O , Pekkanen , J , Rinkkala , P , Tuhkanen , S , Tuononen , A & Virtanen , J-P 2020 , ' Humans use Optokinetic Eye Movements to Track Waypoints for Steering ' , Scientific Reports , vol. 10 , no. 1 , 4175 . https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-60531-3

Title: Humans use Optokinetic Eye Movements to Track Waypoints for Steering
Author: Lappi, Otto; Pekkanen, Jami; Rinkkala, Paavo; Tuhkanen, Samuel; Tuononen, Ari; Virtanen, Juho-Pekka
Contributor organization: Cognitive Science
Faculty of Education Common Matters
TRU (Traffic Research Unit)
Department of Digital Humanities
Mind and Matter
Date: 2020-03-06
Language: eng
Number of pages: 14
Belongs to series: Scientific Reports
ISSN: 2045-2322
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-60531-3
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/313856
Abstract: It is well-established how visual stimuli and self-motion in laboratory conditions reliably elicit retinal image stabilizing compensatory eye movements (CEM). Their organization and roles in natural-task gaze strategies is much less understood: are CEM applied in active sampling of visual information in human locomotion in the wild? If so, how? And what are the implications for guidance? Here, we directly compare gaze behavior in the real world (driving a car) and a fixed base simulation steering task. A strong and quantifiable correspondence between self-rotation and CEM counter-rotation is found across a range of speeds. This gaze behavior is “optokinetic”, i.e. optic flow is a sufficient stimulus to spontaneously elicit it in naïve subjects and vestibular stimulation or stereopsis are not critical. Theoretically, the observed nystagmus behavior is consistent with tracking waypoints on the future path, and predicted by waypoint models of locomotor control - but inconsistent with travel point models, such as the popular tangent point model.It is well-established how visual stimuli and self-motion in laboratory conditions reliably elicit retinal-image-stabilizing compensatory eye movements (CEM). Their organization and roles in natural-task gaze strategies is much less understood: are CEM applied in active sampling of visual information in human locomotion in the wild? If so, how? And what are the implications for guidance? Here, we directly compare gaze behavior in the real world (driving a car) and a fixed base simulation steering task. A strong and quantifiable correspondence between self-rotation and CEM counter-rotation is found across a range of speeds. This gaze behavior is “optokinetic”, i.e. optic flow is a sufficient stimulus to spontaneously elicit it in naïve subjects and vestibular stimulation or stereopsis are not critical. Theoretically, the observed nystagmus behavior is consistent with tracking waypoints on the future path, and predicted by waypoint models of locomotor control - but inconsistent with travel point models, such as the popular tangent point model.
Subject: 6162 Cognitive science
VISUAL STABILIZATION
MECHANISMS
HEAD
DIRECTION
VISION
SPEED
GAZE
FLOW
Peer reviewed: Yes
Rights: cc_by
Usage restriction: openAccess
Self-archived version: publishedVersion
Funder: Academy of Finland
Grant number:


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