Holes in the Outline : Subject-dependent Abstract Quality and its Implications for Scientific Literature Search

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dc.contributor.author Huang, Chien-yu
dc.contributor.author Casey, Arlene
dc.contributor.author Glowacka, Dorota
dc.contributor.author Medlar, Alan
dc.date.accessioned 2020-04-14T06:35:02Z
dc.date.available 2020-04-14T06:35:02Z
dc.date.issued 2019
dc.identifier.citation Huang , C , Casey , A , Glowacka , D & Medlar , A 2019 , Holes in the Outline : Subject-dependent Abstract Quality and its Implications for Scientific Literature Search . in CHIIR '19 : Proceedings of the 2019 Conference on Human Information Interaction and Retrieval . ACM , New York , pp. 289-293 , ACM SIGIR Conference on Human Information Interaction and Retrieval , Glasgow , United Kingdom , 10/03/2019 . https://doi.org/10.1145/3295750.3298953
dc.identifier.citation conference
dc.identifier.other PURE: 132455406
dc.identifier.other PURE UUID: 3539a776-3c83-4575-a8ef-920c8d50e724
dc.identifier.other WOS: 000471026000037
dc.identifier.other Scopus: 85063125752
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10138/313970
dc.description.abstract Scientific literature search engines typically index abstracts instead of the full-text of publications. The expectation is that the abstract provides a comprehensive summary of the article, enumerating key points for the reader to assess whether their information needs could be satisfied by reading the full-text. Furthermore, from a practical standpoint, obtaining the full-text is more complicated due to licensing issues, in the case of commercial publishers, and resource limitations of public repositories and pre-print servers. In this article, we use topic modelling to represent content in abstracts and full-text articles. Using Computer Science as a case study, we demonstrate that how well the abstract summarises the full-text is subfield-dependent. Indeed, we show that abstract representativeness has a direct impact on retrieval performance, with poorer abstracts leading to degraded performance. Finally, we present evidence that how well an abstract represents the full-text of an article is not random, but is a consequence of style and writing conventions in different subdisciplines and can be used to infer an "evolutionary" tree of subfields within Computer Science. en
dc.format.extent 5
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher ACM
dc.relation.ispartof CHIIR '19
dc.relation.isversionof 978-1-4503-6025-8
dc.rights cc_by_nc
dc.rights.uri info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.subject scientific literature search
dc.subject topic models
dc.subject term taxonomy
dc.subject INFORMATION
dc.subject 113 Computer and information sciences
dc.title Holes in the Outline : Subject-dependent Abstract Quality and its Implications for Scientific Literature Search en
dc.type Conference contribution
dc.contributor.organization Department of Computer Science
dc.description.reviewstatus Peer reviewed
dc.relation.doi https://doi.org/10.1145/3295750.3298953
dc.rights.accesslevel openAccess
dc.type.version acceptedVersion

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