Self-rated health and objective health status as predictors of all-cause mortality among older people : a prospective study with a 5-, 10-, and 27-year follow-up

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Wuorela , M , Lavonius , S , Salminen , M , Vahlberg , T , Viitanen , M & Viikari , L 2020 , ' Self-rated health and objective health status as predictors of all-cause mortality among older people : a prospective study with a 5-, 10-, and 27-year follow-up ' , BMC Geriatrics , vol. 20 , no. 1 , 120 . https://doi.org/10.1186/s12877-020-01516-9

Title: Self-rated health and objective health status as predictors of all-cause mortality among older people : a prospective study with a 5-, 10-, and 27-year follow-up
Author: Wuorela, Maarit; Lavonius, Sirkku; Salminen, Marika; Vahlberg, Tero; Viitanen, Matti; Viikari, Laura
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Päijät-Häme Welfare Consortium
Date: 2020-03-30
Language: eng
Number of pages: 7
Belongs to series: BMC Geriatrics
ISSN: 1471-2318
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/314209
Abstract: BackgroundDespite a non-specific nature of self-rated health (SRH), it seems to be a strong predictor of mortality. The aim of this study is to assess the association of SRH and objective health status (OH) with all-cause mortality in 70-year-old community-dwelling older people in Finland.MethodsA prospective study with 5-, 10- and 27-year follow-ups. SRH (n=1008) was assessed with a single question and OH (n=962) by the Rockwood's Frailty Index (FI). To assess the association of SRH and OH with mortality, Cox regression model was used.ResultsOf the 1008 participants, 138 (13.7%), 319 (31.6%), and 932 deceased (86.3%) during the 5-, 10- and 27-year follow-ups, respectively. In unadjusted models, subjects with poor SRH had almost eightfold risk for mortality compared to those with good SRH during the 5-year follow-up; among those with poor OH, the risk was fourfold compared to those with good OH. In the 10-year-follow up, both poor SRH and poor OH predicted about fourfold risk for mortality compared to those with good health. During the 27-year follow-up, OH was a stronger predictor of mortality than SRH. Poor SRH, compared to good SRH, showed 95% sensitivity and 34% specificity for 5-year mortality; corresponding figures for OH were 54 and 80%, respectively.ConclusionsSingle-item SRH seems to be able to capture almost the same as OH in predicting a short-term (less than 10years) mortality risk among older adults in clinical settings. The use of SHR may also enhance the focus on patient-centered care.
Subject: Frailty
Mortality
Objective health
Older people
Self-rated health
MINI-MENTAL-STATE
GENERAL HEALTH
FRAILTY
ASSOCIATION
ADULTS
COMORBIDITY
PREVALENCE
DEMENTIA
OUTCOMES
EXPLAIN
3121 General medicine, internal medicine and other clinical medicine
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