Behavioural alterations in piglets after surgical castration : Effects of analgesia and anaesthesia

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Yun , J , Ollila , A , Valros , A , Larenza Menzies , M P , Heinonen , M , Oliviero , C & Peltoniemi , O 2019 , ' Behavioural alterations in piglets after surgical castration : Effects of analgesia and anaesthesia ' , Research in Veterinary Science , vol. 125 , pp. 36-42 . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rvsc.2019.05.009

Title: Behavioural alterations in piglets after surgical castration : Effects of analgesia and anaesthesia
Author: Yun, Jinhyeon; Ollila, Anna; Valros, Anna; Larenza Menzies, Maria Paula; Heinonen, Mari; Oliviero, Claudio; Peltoniemi, Olli
Other contributor: University of Helsinki, Production Animal Medicine
University of Helsinki, Production Animal Hospital
University of Helsinki, Production Animal Medicine
University of Helsinki, Production Animal Medicine
University of Helsinki, Production Animal Medicine
University of Helsinki, Helsinki One Health (HOH)





Date: 2019-08-01
Language: eng
Number of pages: 7
Belongs to series: Research in Veterinary Science
ISSN: 0034-5288
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rvsc.2019.05.009
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/314994
Abstract: The present study aimed to use behavioural measures to assess pain induced by surgical castration of piglets, and evaluate the efficacy of pain-relief medications. In total, 143 male piglets from 29 sows were used. The treatments included: 1) non-castration (NC; n = 28), 2) castration without medication (SC; n = 29), 3) castration with meloxicam injection 0.4 mg/kg i.m. (ME; n = 28), 4) castration with 0.5 ml of 2% lidocaine in each testicle (LA; n = 29), and 5) castration with general inhalation anaesthesia using isoflurane (1.5%) and meloxicam injection (GA; n = 29). Behaviour was monitored continuously for a ten minute period one hour prior to castration (−1 h), as well as immediately (0 h), one hour (1 h), and two hours (2 h) after castration. Behaviour was also monitored twice (08:00 and 20:00) during the following day. Compared to −1 h, castration induced changes in several behavioural measures in SC piglets at 0 h, suggesting that castration was painful. Furthermore, inactive standing or sitting, tail wagging and aggressive behaviour differed between SC and NC piglets at 0 h. ME and LA piglets spent less time standing or sitting inactively, and LA and GA piglets showed more tail wagging than SC piglets at 0 h (P < 0.05 for all). No other behavioural measures differed among the various groups of castrated piglets. In conclusion, the results indicate that surgical castration is indeed painful. However, the efficacy of various pain-relief protocols in piglets shortly after castration was not verified.
Subject: ANIMALS
Anaesthesia
Analgesia
EMOTIONS
ISOFLURANE
LAMBS
MANAGEMENT
MELOXICAM
PAIN ALLEVIATION
PIGS
Pain assessment
Pain behaviour
Piglet castration
RESPONSES
Social contagion
413 Veterinary science
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