Heavy Screen Use on Weekends in Childhood Predicts Increased Body Mass Index in Adolescence : A Three-Year Follow-Up Study

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http://hdl.handle.net/10138/315752

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Engberg , E , Figueiredo , R A O , Rounge , T B , Weiderpass , E & Viljakainen , H 2020 , ' Heavy Screen Use on Weekends in Childhood Predicts Increased Body Mass Index in Adolescence : A Three-Year Follow-Up Study ' , Journal of Adolescent Health , vol. 66 , no. 5 , pp. 559-566 . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jadohealth.2019.09.002

Title: Heavy Screen Use on Weekends in Childhood Predicts Increased Body Mass Index in Adolescence : A Three-Year Follow-Up Study
Author: Engberg, Elina; Figueiredo, Rejane A.O.; Rounge, Trine B.; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Viljakainen, Heli
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Clinicum
University of Helsinki, Medicum
University of Helsinki, Medicum
University of Helsinki, World Health Organization
University of Helsinki, Department of Food and Nutrition
Date: 2020-05
Language: eng
Number of pages: 8
Belongs to series: Journal of Adolescent Health
ISSN: 1054-139X
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/315752
Abstract: Purpose We aimed to examine whether sedentary screen time changes when transitioning from childhood to adolescence and whether children's screen time, separately for school days and weekends, affects body mass index (BMI) in adolescents. Methods This prospective 3-year follow-up study included 5,084 children with a mean (standard deviation) age of 11 (1) years at baseline and 14 (1) years at follow-up. Children reported screen time, more specifically, time spent viewing TV programs and using a computer outside school while sitting. We categorized children into light, medium, and heavy TV viewers and computer users separately for school days and weekends. We also calculated the age- and gender-specific BMI z-score (BMIz). Results Time spent viewing TV changed from baseline to follow-up on school days and on weekends (p <.001 for both); the proportion of heavy TV viewers on school days (≥3 h/d) increased from 16% to 23% and on weekends (≥4 h/d) from 19% to 30%. Heavy TV viewers and computer users on both school days and on weekends had a higher BMIz 3 years later (p <.001 for all). After adjusting for age, gender, language, baseline BMIz, sleep duration, eating habits, exercise, and the other screen-time variables, heavy TV viewing on weekends remained significantly associated with an increased BMIz at follow-up (B = .078; p = .013). Conclusions The proportion of heavy screen users increases when transitioning from childhood to adolescence. Moreover, heavy screen use, especially on weekends in 11-year-old children, is associated with an increased BMI 3 years later.
Subject: Screen time
TV viewing
Computer use
Sedentary behavior
Body mass index
Adiposity
Children
Adolescents
515 Psychology
3142 Public health care science, environmental and occupational health
3123 Gynaecology and paediatrics
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