The impact of TMS and PNS frequencies on MEP potentiation in PAS with high-frequency peripheral component

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Mezes , M , Havu , R , Tolmacheva , A , Lioumis , P , Mäkelä , J P & Shulga , A 2020 , ' The impact of TMS and PNS frequencies on MEP potentiation in PAS with high-frequency peripheral component ' , PLoS One , vol. 15 , no. 5 , 0233999 . https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0233999

Title: The impact of TMS and PNS frequencies on MEP potentiation in PAS with high-frequency peripheral component
Author: Mezes, Magdolna; Havu, Roope; Tolmacheva, Aleksandra; Lioumis, Pantelis; Mäkelä, Jyrki P.; Shulga, Anastasia
Contributor organization: HUS Medical Imaging Center
BioMag Laboratory
University of Helsinki
Helsinki University Hospital Area
HUS Neurocenter
Department of Neurosciences
Neurologian yksikkö
Date: 2020-05-29
Language: eng
Number of pages: 13
Belongs to series: PLoS One
ISSN: 1932-6203
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0233999
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/316738
Abstract: Paired associative stimulation (PAS) combines transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) to induce plastic changes in the corticospinal tract. PAS employing single 0.2-Hz TMS pulses synchronized with the first pulse of 50–100 Hz PNS trains potentiates motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) in a stable manner in healthy participants and enhances voluntary motor output in spinal cord injury (SCI) patients. We further investigated the impact of settings of this PAS variant on MEP potentiation in healthy subjects. In experiment 1, we compared 0.2-Hz vs 0.4-Hz PAS. In experiment 2, PNS frequencies of 100 Hz, 200 Hz, and 400 Hz were compared. In experiment 3, we added a second TMS pulse. When compared with 0.4-Hz PAS, 0.2-Hz PAS was significantly more effective after 30 minutes (p = 0.05) and 60 minutes (p = 0.014). MEP potentiation by PAS with 100-Hz and 200-Hz PNS did not differ. PAS with 400-Hz PNS was less effective than 100-Hz (p = 0.023) and 200-Hz (p = 0.013) PNS. Adding an extra TMS pulse rendered PAS strongly inhibitory. These negative findings demonstrate that the 0.2-Hz PAS with 100-Hz PNS previously used in clinical studies is optimal and the modifications employed here do not enhance its efficacy.
Subject: 3124 Neurology and psychiatry
Peer reviewed: Yes
Rights: cc_by
Usage restriction: openAccess
Self-archived version: publishedVersion


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