Smoking or poor oral hygiene do not predispose to peritonsillar abscesses via changes in oral flora

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Sanmark , E , Wiksten , J , Välimaa , H & Blomgren , K 2019 , ' Smoking or poor oral hygiene do not predispose to peritonsillar abscesses via changes in oral flora ' , Acta Oto-Laryngologica , vol. 139 , no. 9 , pp. 798-802 . https://doi.org/10.1080/00016489.2019.1631479

Title: Smoking or poor oral hygiene do not predispose to peritonsillar abscesses via changes in oral flora
Author: Sanmark, Enni; Wiksten, Johanna; Välimaa, Hannamari; Blomgren, Karin
Contributor: University of Helsinki, HUS Head and Neck Center
University of Helsinki, HUS Head and Neck Center
University of Helsinki, Department of Virology
University of Helsinki, HUS Head and Neck Center
Date: 2019-09-02
Language: eng
Number of pages: 5
Belongs to series: Acta Oto-Laryngologica
ISSN: 0001-6489
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/316988
Abstract: Aim: The purpose of this prospective study was to determine if there is a difference in number and distribution of salivary bacteria between patients with tonsillar infection and healthy volunteers. Background: The etiology of peritonsillar abscess (PTA) is unclear. Smoking, periodontal disease, and infection of minor salivary glands have been suggested as predisposing factors for PTA. Material and methods: Patients with acute tonsillitis (AT) (n = 54), peritonsillitis (PT) (n = 36), PTA (n = 58), and healthy volunteers (n = 52) were prospectively recruited and evaluated. Saliva bacteria were analyzed with flow cytometry. Patients and their treating physicians completed a questionnaire about patients' current disease, smoking habits, alcohol consumption, and oral health. Results: There were no differences in the total number of saliva bacteria between patients with acute throat infection and healthy volunteers (p = .104) or between AT, PT, and PTA patients (p = .273). Smoking habits, alcohol consumption, oral hygiene, or prior antibiotics had no effect on total amount of salivary bacteria in patients with acute throat infection. Conclusions: The effects of smoking on salivary bacteria do not seem to be the mechanism that promotes development of PTA in smokers.
Subject: Salivary bacteria
tonsillar infection
flow cytometry
IN-SITU HYBRIDIZATION
PERIODONTAL-DISEASE
NONSMOKER PATIENTS
SMOKER
QUANTIFICATION
MICROBIOME
BACTERIA
FISH
3125 Otorhinolaryngology, ophthalmology
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