Limited dispersal and an unexpected aggression pattern in a native supercolonial ant

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dc.contributor University of Helsinki, Organismal and Evolutionary Biology Research Programme en
dc.contributor University of Helsinki, Organismal and Evolutionary Biology Research Programme en
dc.contributor University of Helsinki, Organismal and Evolutionary Biology Research Programme en
dc.contributor.author Hakala, Sanja M.
dc.contributor.author Ittonen, Mats
dc.contributor.author Seppä, Perttu
dc.contributor.author Helanterä, Heikki
dc.date.accessioned 2020-06-29T08:04:01Z
dc.date.available 2020-06-29T08:04:01Z
dc.date.issued 2020-04
dc.identifier.citation Hakala , S M , Ittonen , M , Seppä , P & Helanterä , H 2020 , ' Limited dispersal and an unexpected aggression pattern in a native supercolonial ant ' , Ecology and Evolution , vol. 10 , no. 8 , pp. 3671-3685 . https://doi.org/10.1002/ece3.6154 en
dc.identifier.issn 2045-7758
dc.identifier.other PURE: 133896459
dc.identifier.other PURE UUID: a451e078-9a07-4857-b180-5748f954313a
dc.identifier.other RIS: urn:FD0B2D6B9A50D68CD9183692896FB2B4
dc.identifier.other WOS: 000525751200008
dc.identifier.other ORCID: /0000-0001-5393-6943/work/76723580
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10138/317024
dc.description.abstract Abstract Understanding how social groups function requires studies on how individuals move across the landscape and interact with each other. Ant supercolonies are extreme cooperative units that may consist of thousands of interconnected nests, and their individuals cooperate over large spatial scales. However, the inner structure of suggested supercolonial (or unicolonial) societies has rarely been extensively studied using both genetic and behavioral analyses. We describe a dense supercolony-like aggregation of more than 1,300 nests of the ant Formica (Coptoformica) pressilabris. We performed aggression assays and found that, while aggression levels were generally low, there was some aggression within the assumed supercolony. The occurrence of aggression increased with distance from the focal nest, in accordance with the genetically viscous population structure we observe by using 10 DNA microsatellite markers. However, the aggressive interactions do not follow any clear pattern that would allow specifying colony borders within the area. The genetic data indicate limited gene flow within and away from the supercolony. Our results show that a Formica supercolony is not necessarily a single unit but can be a more fluid mosaic of aggressive and amicable interactions instead, highlighting the need to study internest interactions in detail when describing supercolonies. en
dc.format.extent 15
dc.language.iso eng
dc.relation.ispartof Ecology and Evolution
dc.rights en
dc.subject aggression assay en
dc.subject dispersal en
dc.subject Hymenoptera en
dc.subject nestmate recognition en
dc.subject polydomy en
dc.subject polygyny en
dc.subject 1181 Ecology, evolutionary biology en
dc.title Limited dispersal and an unexpected aggression pattern in a native supercolonial ant en
dc.type Article
dc.description.version Peer reviewed
dc.identifier.doi https://doi.org/10.1002/ece3.6154
dc.type.uri info:eu-repo/semantics/other
dc.type.uri info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion
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