Effects of urban infrastructure on aquatic invertebrate diversity

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http://hdl.handle.net/10138/317734

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Vehkaoja , M , Niemi , M & Vaananen , V-M 2020 , ' Effects of urban infrastructure on aquatic invertebrate diversity ' , Urban Ecosystems , vol. 23 , pp. 831-840 . https://doi.org/10.1007/s11252-020-00947-x

Title: Effects of urban infrastructure on aquatic invertebrate diversity
Author: Vehkaoja, Mia; Niemi, Milla; Vaananen, Veli-Matti
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Research Services
University of Helsinki, Metsähallitus, Wildlife Service Finland
University of Helsinki, Department of Forest Sciences
Date: 2020-03-03
Language: eng
Number of pages: 10
Belongs to series: Urban Ecosystems
ISSN: 1083-8155
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/317734
Abstract: Wetlands are one of the world's most important, economically valuable, and diverse ecosystems. A major proportion of wetland biodiversity is composed of aquatic invertebrates, which are essential for secondary production in aquatic and terrestrial food webs. Urban areas have intensified the challenges wetlands encounter by increasing the area of impermeable surfaces and the levels of nutrient and pollutant overflows. We investigated how urban infrastructure affects the aquatic invertebrate fauna of urban wetlands in metropolitan Helsinki, southern Finland. We measured riparian canopy cover, emergent vegetation coverage, and various land cover and road variables. Recreation area, forests, and open natural areas were the most important landscape features positively influencing aquatic invertebrate family richness, whereas buildings and roads had a negative effect on family richness and abundances of many taxa. Recreation area and the various forest types also positively affected the alpha-diversity indices of wetlands. On the other hand, fish assemblage did not affect either family richness or abundances of the studied taxa. Furthermore, trees growing on the shoreline negatively affected the diversity of aquatic invertebrate families. Invertebrate family diversity was greatest at well-connected wetlands, as these areas added to the regional species pool by over 33%. Our results show that connectivity and green areas near wetlands increase aquatic invertebrate family diversity, and our results could be utilized in urban planning. Graphical abstract
Subject: urban landscape
urban planning
wetlands
wetland biodiversity
urban wetlands
stormwater wetlands
FRESH-WATER BIODIVERSITY
SPECIES RICHNESS
MACROINVERTEBRATE BIODIVERSITY
COMMUNITY STRUCTURE
CONSERVATION VALUE
REGIONAL RICHNESS
FOREST CANOPY
PONDS
FOOD
METACOMMUNITY
1172 Environmental sciences
4112 Forestry
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