Usual and unusual suspects : What network analysis can tell us about climate policy integration

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Pramova , E , Locatelli , B , Di Gregorio , M & Brockhaus , M 2020 ' Usual and unusual suspects : What network analysis can tell us about climate policy integration ' CIFOR Infobrief , no. 282 , Center for International Forestry Research . https://doi.org/10.17528/cifor/007592

Titel: Usual and unusual suspects : What network analysis can tell us about climate policy integration
Författare: Pramova, Emilia; Locatelli, Bruno; Di Gregorio, Monica; Brockhaus, Maria
Upphovmannens organisation: International Forest Policy
Helsinki Institute of Sustainability Science (HELSUS)
Department of Forest Sciences
Utgivare: Center for International Forestry Research
Datum: 2020-03
Språk: eng
Sidantal: 6
Tillhör serie: CIFOR Infobrief
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17528/cifor/007592
Permanenta länken (URI): http://hdl.handle.net/10138/317765
Abstrakt: Key messages Understanding adaptation-mitigation linkages helps identify co-benefits and reduce negative interactions between the two climate change domains. Barriers include working in institutional siloes and lack of information: adaptation actors are not well-informed about mitigation actions and vice-versa. Policy network analysis sheds light on adaptation-mitigation actor interactions and what can be done to improve them. It reveals both the usual and unusual suspects who can foster linkages between the two domains. This InfoBrief summarizes the findings of a climate change policy network analysis conducted in Peru and published in the journal Climate Policy (Locatelli et al. 2020).
Subject: 1172 Environmental sciences
Licens: cc_by
Användningsbegränsning: openAccess
Parallelpublicerad version: publishedVersion


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