Temperature affected the formation of arbuscular mycorrhizas and ectomycorrhizas in Populus angustifolia seedlings more than a mild drought

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Kilpeläinen , J , Aphalo , P J & Lehto , T 2020 , ' Temperature affected the formation of arbuscular mycorrhizas and ectomycorrhizas in Populus angustifolia seedlings more than a mild drought ' , Soil Biology & Biochemistry , vol. 146 , 107798 . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.soilbio.2020.107798

Title: Temperature affected the formation of arbuscular mycorrhizas and ectomycorrhizas in Populus angustifolia seedlings more than a mild drought
Author: Kilpeläinen, Jouni; Aphalo, Pedro J.; Lehto, Tarja
Contributor organization: Plant Biology
Viikki Plant Science Centre (ViPS)
Sensory and Physiological Ecology of Plants (SenPEP)
Organismal and Evolutionary Biology Research Programme
Date: 2020-07
Language: eng
Number of pages: 12
Belongs to series: Soil Biology & Biochemistry
ISSN: 0038-0717
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.soilbio.2020.107798
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/317771
Abstract: Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) plants and fungi associate with lower soil organic matter, higher pH, lower phosphorus and higher nitrogen than ectomycorrhizal (EM) ones. However, soil conditions correlate with climatic factors, and we suggest that temperature and humidity have also direct roles in the success of mycorrhiza types. The hypothesis here is that EM perform better at low temperatures than AM, and AM resist drought better than EM. Narrowleaf cottonwood (Populus angustifolia E. James) forms both AM and EM. We grew seedlings in soil at 14, 20 and 26 °C in factorial combinations with adequate watering and a cyclic mild drought for 4 and 7 weeks. As hypothesized, the percent of EM root tips was largest at 14 °C, while the proportional root length with AM was largest at the two higher temperatures. However, unlike expectations, drought increased EM formation slightly, while the AM colonization was lower in the dry treatment. Plant growth was reduced more by low temperature than drought. Root branching was more prominent at low temperature and root length and mass growth at higher temperatures. Soil nutrient availability did not provide a direct explanation to the results, as both soluble soil N and P were the same in 14 and 20 °C, while the change in mycorrhiza colonization took place between these temperatures. Differences in root morphology (root branching vs length) may affect the proportions of the mycorrhiza types at different temperature regimes. The most likely explanation to the differential colonization is that temperature affects AM and EM fungi in a different way. In nature, temperature and humidity regimes are tightly correlated, and temperature as such may be a stronger determinant for the success of mycorrhiza types than has been previously considered. The poorer performance of AM in low-temperature and drought conditions may reflect stress avoidance rather than stress tolerance by AM fungi.
Subject: Arbuscular mycorrhiza
Cold
Dual mycorrhiza
Ectomycorrhiza
Nutrients
Water stress
FUNGI
FINE ROOTS
NORWAY SPRUCE
ACCLIMATION
FROZEN SOIL
GROWTH
ADAPTATION
SOIL-TEMPERATURE
EXTERNAL MYCELIUM
ROOT COLONIZATION
11832 Microbiology and virology
11831 Plant biology
Peer reviewed: Yes
Rights: cc_by_nc_nd
Usage restriction: openAccess
Self-archived version: publishedVersion


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