Ecology of Neglected Rodent-Borne American Orthohantaviruses

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http://hdl.handle.net/10138/317795

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Mull , N , Jackson , R , Sironen , T & Forbes , K M 2020 , ' Ecology of Neglected Rodent-Borne American Orthohantaviruses ' , Pathogens , vol. 9 , no. 5 , 325 . https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens9050325

Title: Ecology of Neglected Rodent-Borne American Orthohantaviruses
Author: Mull, Nathaniel; Jackson, Reilly; Sironen, Tarja; Forbes, Kristian M.
Other contributor: University of Helsinki, Helsinki One Health (HOH)





Date: 2020-05
Language: eng
Number of pages: 19
Belongs to series: Pathogens
ISSN: 2076-0817
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens9050325
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/317795
Abstract: The number of documented American orthohantaviruses has increased significantly over recent decades, but most fundamental research has remained focused on just two of them: Andes virus (ANDV) and Sin Nombre virus (SNV). The majority of American orthohantaviruses are known to cause disease in humans, and most of these pathogenic strains were not described prior to human cases, indicating the importance of understanding all members of the virus clade. In this review, we summarize information on the ecology of under-studied rodent-borne American orthohantaviruses to form general conclusions and highlight important gaps in knowledge. Information regarding the presence and genetic diversity of many orthohantaviruses throughout the distributional range of their hosts is minimal and would significantly benefit from virus isolations to indicate a reservoir role. Additionally, few studies have investigated the mechanisms underlying transmission routes and factors affecting the environmental persistence of orthohantaviruses, limiting our understanding of factors driving prevalence fluctuations. As landscapes continue to change, host ranges and human exposure to orthohantaviruses likely will as well. Research on the ecology of neglected orthohantaviruses is necessary for understanding both current and future threats to human health.
Subject: Hantaviridae
hantavirus
HCPS
host-switch
reservoir
spillover
transmission
HANTAVIRUS PULMONARY SYNDROME
SIN-NOMBRE-VIRUS
PYGMY RICE RAT
TO-PERSON TRANSMISSION
CREEK-CANAL-VIRUS
RIO MAMORE VIRUS
GENETIC DIVERSITY
GEOGRAPHIC-DISTRIBUTION
PEROMYSCUS-MANICULATUS
SIGMODONTINE RODENTS
3111 Biomedicine
11832 Microbiology and virology
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