Environmental Factors Override Dispersal-Related Factors in Shaping Diatom and Macroinvertebrate Communities Within Stream Networks in China

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He , S , Soininen , J , Chen , K & Wang , B 2020 , ' Environmental Factors Override Dispersal-Related Factors in Shaping Diatom and Macroinvertebrate Communities Within Stream Networks in China ' , Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution , vol. 8 , no. 141 , 141 . https://doi.org/10.3389/fevo.2020.00141

Title: Environmental Factors Override Dispersal-Related Factors in Shaping Diatom and Macroinvertebrate Communities Within Stream Networks in China
Author: He, Siwen; Soininen, Janne; Chen, Kai; Wang, Beixin
Other contributor: University of Helsinki, Department of Geosciences and Geography


Date: 2020-05-19
Language: eng
Number of pages: 11
Belongs to series: Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution
ISSN: 2296-701X
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3389/fevo.2020.00141
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/318240
Abstract: Metacommunity theory provides a useful framework to describe the underlying factors (e.g., environmental and dispersal-related factors) influencing community structure. The strength of these factors may vary depending on the properties of the region studied (e.g., environmental heterogeneity and spatial location) and considered biological groups. Here, we examined environmental and dispersal-related controls of stream macroinvertebrates and diatoms in three regions in China using the distance-decay relationship analysis. We performed analyses for the whole stream network and separately for two stream network locations (headwater and downstream sites) to test the network position hypothesis (NPH), which states that the strength of environmental and dispersal-related controls varies between headwater and downstream communities. Community dissimilarities were significantly related to environmental distances, but not geographical distances. These results suggest that communities are structured strongly by environmental filtering, but weakly by dispersal-related factors such as dispersal limitation. More importantly, we found that, at the whole network scale, environmental control was the highest in the regions with highest environmental heterogeneity. Results further showed that the influence of environmental control was strong in both headwaters and downstream sites, whereas spatial control was generally weak in all sites. This suggests a lack of consistent support for the NPH in our studied stream networks. Moreover, we found that local-scale variables relative to basin-scale variables better explained community dissimilarities for diatoms than for macroinvertebrates. This indicates that diatoms and macroinvertebrates responded to environment at different scales. Collectively, these results suggest that the importance of drivers behind the metacommunity assembly varied among regions with different level of environmental heterogeneity and between organism groups, potentially indicating context dependency among stream systems and taxa.
Subject: environmental filtering
distance-decay
dispersal
spatial scale
environmental heterogeneity
dendritic networks
POSITION HYPOTHESIS
BETA DIVERSITY
METACOMMUNITIES
MODE
HETEROGENEITY
LIMITATION
TRAITS
ROLES
SIZE
1172 Environmental sciences
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