Population growth correlates with increased fecundity in three-spined stickleback populations in a human-disturbed environment

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http://hdl.handle.net/10138/318389

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Candolin , U & Voigt , H-R 2020 , ' Population growth correlates with increased fecundity in three-spined stickleback populations in a human-disturbed environment ' , Aquatic Sciences , vol. 82 , no. 2 , 21 . https://doi.org/10.1007/s00027-020-0695-3

Title: Population growth correlates with increased fecundity in three-spined stickleback populations in a human-disturbed environment
Author: Candolin, Ulrika; Voigt, Heinz-Rudolf
Contributor organization: Organismal and Evolutionary Biology Research Programme
Helsinki Institute of Sustainability Science (HELSUS)
Biosciences
Behavioural Ecology - Candolin Research Lab
Date: 2020-01-10
Language: eng
Number of pages: 7
Belongs to series: Aquatic Sciences
ISSN: 1015-1621
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00027-020-0695-3
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/318389
Abstract: Human activity is altering the dynamics of populations through effects on fecundity, mortality and migration. An increased abundance of three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) in the Baltic Sea has been attributed to a human-caused decline of top predators. However, recent research indicates that a top-down effect cannot fully explain the population growth, but the contribution of a bottom-up effect has not been investigated. Yet, anthropogenic eutrophication has increased algae biomass at the spawning sites of the stickleback and, thus, the abundance of benthic prey. We investigated if increased fecundity could have contributed to the population growth of the stickleback by analysing a two decade time series of stickleback abundance, fecundity, and body size at three spawning sites. The results show an increase in the proportion of gravid females in the populations, which correlates with the population growth. In particular, the proportion of gravid females late in the spawning season has increased, which indicates enhanced food intake at the sites during the spawning season. Thus, a bottom-up effect could have contributed to the growth of the populations by increasing the number of egg clutches females produce. These results stress the importance of considering both bottom-up and top-down processes when investigating the mechanisms behind human impact on population dynamics.
Subject: ALTERS
BOTTOM-UP CONTROL
Bottom-up effect
CLADOPHORA-GLOMERATA
CLIMATE-CHANGE
Environmental change
Eutrophication
FISH
GASTEROSTEUS-ACULEATUS
Population dynamics
Population regulation
REPRODUCTIVE-PERFORMANCE
Reproduction
SELECTION
THREESPINE STICKLEBACK
TOP-DOWN
1181 Ecology, evolutionary biology
Peer reviewed: Yes
Rights: cc_by
Usage restriction: openAccess
Self-archived version: publishedVersion


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