Social class and the risk of unemployment : Trends, gender differences and the contribution of education

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Lahtinen , H , Sirniö , O & Martikainen , P 2020 , ' Social class and the risk of unemployment : Trends, gender differences and the contribution of education ' , Acta Sociologica , vol. 63 , no. 3 , pp. 303-321 . https://doi.org/10.1177/0001699318817594

Title: Social class and the risk of unemployment : Trends, gender differences and the contribution of education
Author: Lahtinen, Hannu; Sirniö, Outi; Martikainen, Pekka
Contributor organization: Demography
Center for Population, Health and Society
Population Research Unit (PRU)
Helsinki Inequality Initiative (INEQ)
Sociology
Date: 2020-08-01
Language: eng
Number of pages: 19
Belongs to series: Acta Sociologica
ISSN: 0001-6993
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1177/0001699318817594
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/318415
Abstract: Previous research has shown that an advantaged social class position protects individuals from unemployment, but less is known about how this relationship has developed after the turn of the millennium, how it varies by gender and to what extent education contributes to the association between these factors. We assess these questions using register-based data on the Finnish labour force over a 28-year period between 1988 and 2015. The overall risk of unemployment was 2.7–3.7-fold among manual classes compared to upper non-manual classes, and 1.4–1.7-fold among lower compared to upper non-manual classes. Controlling for education attenuated the differences between social classes by about two-thirds. Social class disparities were somewhat more distinct among men than among women, but gender differences narrowed over time. Overall, temporal changes were small, especially among men, except for a curvilinear pattern observed for the relative unemployment risk of the lower non-manual class. To conclude, despite a comparatively egalitarian context and drastic changes in economic conditions and labour market structures over time, social stratification in unemployment has been substantial and considerably persistent. This is in line with the conceptualization of social class underpinning differing employment relations and, therefore, inherently creating variation in labour market risks.
Subject: 5141 Sociology
Peer reviewed: Yes
Rights: cc_by_nc
Usage restriction: openAccess
Self-archived version: publishedVersion


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