Multifunctional 3D-printed patches for long-term drug release therapies after myocardial infarction

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http://hdl.handle.net/10138/318423

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Ajdary , R , Zanjanizadeh Ezazi , N , Rebelo Correia , A M , Kemell , M , Huan , S , Ruskoaho , H , Hirvonen , J , Santos , H A & Rojas , O J 2020 , ' Multifunctional 3D-printed patches for long-term drug release therapies after myocardial infarction ' , Advanced Functional Materials , vol. 30 , no. 34 , 2003440 . https://doi.org/10.1002/adfm.202003440

Title: Multifunctional 3D-printed patches for long-term drug release therapies after myocardial infarction
Author: Ajdary, Rubina; Zanjanizadeh Ezazi, Nazanin; Rebelo Correia, Alexandra Maria; Kemell, Marianna; Huan, Siqi; Ruskoaho, Heikki; Hirvonen, Jouni; Santos, Hélder A.; Rojas, Orlando J.
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Nanomedicines and Biomedical Engineering
University of Helsinki, Division of Pharmaceutical Chemistry and Technology
University of Helsinki, Department of Chemistry
University of Helsinki, Regenerative pharmacology group
University of Helsinki, Drug Research Program
University of Helsinki, Helsinki One Health (HOH)
Date: 2020-08-19
Language: eng
Number of pages: 10
Belongs to series: Advanced Functional Materials
ISSN: 1616-3028
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/318423
Abstract: A biomaterial system incorporating nanocellulose, poly(glycerol sebacate), and polypyrrole is introduced for the treatment of myocardial infarction. Direct ink writing of the multicomponent aqueous suspensions allows multifunctional lattice structures that not only feature elasticity and electrical conductivity but enable cell growth. They are proposed as cardiac patches given their biocompatibility with H9c2 cardiomyoblasts, which attach extensively at the microstructural level, and induce their proliferation for 28 days. Two model drugs (3i‐1000 and curcumin) are investigated for their integration in the patches, either by loading in the precursor suspension used for extrusion or by direct impregnation of the as‐obtained, dry lattice. In studies of drug release conducted for five months, a slow in vitro degradation of the cardiac patches is observed, which prevents drug burst release and indicates their suitability for long‐term therapy. The combination of biocompatibility, biodegradability, mechanical strength, flexibility, and electrical conductivity fulfills the requirement of the highly dynamic and functional electroresponsive cardiac tissue. Overall, the proposed cardiac patches are viable alternatives for the regeneration of myocardium after infarction through the effective integration of cardiac cells with the biomaterial.
Subject: 116 Chemical sciences
317 Pharmacy
cardiac myoblasts
cardiac patches
direct ink writing
drug release
nanocellulose
CARDIAC PATCH
POLY(GLYCEROL SEBACATE)
CELL
NANOCELLULOSE
SCAFFOLDS
POLYPYRROLE
CELLULOSE
CURCUMIN
DELIVERY
DEGRADATION
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