Genomic signatures of domestication in Old World camels

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Fitak , R R , Mohandesan , E , Corander , J , Yadamsuren , A , Chuluunbat , B , Abdelhadi , O , Raziq , A , Nagy , P , Walzer , C , Faye , B & Burger , P A 2020 , ' Genomic signatures of domestication in Old World camels ' , Communications Biology , vol. 3 , 316 . https://doi.org/10.1038/s42003-020-1039-5

Title: Genomic signatures of domestication in Old World camels
Author: Fitak, Robert Rodgers; Mohandesan, Elmira; Corander, Jukka; Yadamsuren, Adiya; Chuluunbat, Battsetseg; Abdelhadi, Omer; Raziq, Abdul; Nagy, Peter; Walzer, Chris; Faye, Bernard; Burger, Pamela Anna
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Helsinki Institute for Information Technology
Date: 2020-06-19
Language: eng
Number of pages: 10
Belongs to series: Communications Biology
ISSN: 2399-3642
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/318563
Abstract: Domestication begins with the selection of animals showing less fear of humans. In most domesticates, selection signals for tameness have been superimposed by intensive breeding for economical or other desirable traits. Old World camels, conversely, have maintained high genetic variation and lack secondary bottlenecks associated with breed development. By re-sequencing multiple genomes from dromedaries, Bactrian camels, and their endangered wild relatives, here we show that positive selection for candidate genes underlying traits collectively referred to as 'domestication syndrome' is consistent with neural crest deficiencies and altered thyroid hormone-based signaling. Comparing our results with other domestic species, we postulate that the core set of domestication genes is considerably smaller than the pan-domestication set - and overlapping genes are likely a result of chance and redundancy. These results, along with the extensive genomic resources provided, are an important contribution to understanding the evolutionary history of camels and the genomic features of their domestication. Robert R. Fitak et al. investigate the genetic basis for domestication in camels. They found that the positive selection of candidate domestication genes is consistent with neural crest deficiencies and altered thyroid hormone-based signaling. Their work provides insights to the evolutionary history of camels and genetics of domestication.
Subject: GENETIC DIVERSITY
BACTRIAN CAMELS
ANNOTATION
DEFICIENCY
ADAPTATION
PHENOTYPES
MUTATIONS
DROMEDARY
COMPONENT
BEHAVIOR
111 Mathematics
112 Statistics and probability
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