Parental reports showed that snoring in infants at three and eight months associated with snoring parents and smoking mothers

Show full item record



Permalink

http://hdl.handle.net/10138/318772

Citation

Katila , M , Saarenpaa-Heikkila , O , Saha , M-T , Vuorela , N & Paavonen , E J 2019 , ' Parental reports showed that snoring in infants at three and eight months associated with snoring parents and smoking mothers ' , Acta Paediatrica , vol. 108 , no. 9 , pp. 1686-1694 . https://doi.org/10.1111/apa.14758

Title: Parental reports showed that snoring in infants at three and eight months associated with snoring parents and smoking mothers
Author: Katila, Maija; Saarenpaa-Heikkila, Outi; Saha, Marja-Terttu; Vuorela, Nina; Paavonen, E. Juulia
Contributor: University of Helsinki, HUS Children and Adolescents
University of Helsinki, HUS Children and Adolescents
Date: 2019-09
Language: eng
Number of pages: 9
Belongs to series: Acta Paediatrica
ISSN: 0803-5253
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/318772
Abstract: Aim This prospective study examined the prevalence of snoring during infancy and the prenatal and postnatal risk factors for this condition. Methods The study population comprised 1388 infants from the CHILD-SLEEP birth cohort, who were recruited in the Pirkanmaa Hospital District, Finland, between 2011 and 2013. Sleep and background factor questionnaires were filled out prenatally by parents and when the infant was three and eight months old. Results The prevalence of habitual snoring was 3.2% at the age of three months and 3.0% at eight months, and snoring infants had more sleeping difficulties at those ages, with odds ratios (ORs) of 3.11 and 4.63, respectively. At three months, snoring infants slept for a shorter length of time (p = 0.001) and their sleep was more restless (p = 0.004). In ordinal logistic regression models, parental snoring (adjusted OR = 1.65 and 2.60) and maternal smoking (adjusted OR = 2.21 and 2.17) were significantly associated with infant snoring at three and eight months, while formula feeding and dummy use (adjusted OR = 1.48 and 1.56) were only associated with infant snoring at three months. Conclusion Parental snoring and maternal smoking increased the risk of snoring. Infants who snored also seemed to suffer more from other sleep difficulties.
Subject: Infant
Prevalence
Sleep-disordered breathing
Smoking
Snoring
LONG-TERM CHANGES
SLEEP
CHILDREN
PREVALENCE
SYMPTOMS
RISK
QUESTIONNAIRE
VALIDATION
CHILDHOOD
BEHAVIOR
3123 Gynaecology and paediatrics
Rights:


Files in this item

Total number of downloads: Loading...

Files Size Format View
Parental_reports_showed_that_snoring.pdf 241.1Kb PDF View/Open

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record