Suicide by crashing into a heavy vehicle : A one-year follow-up study of professional drivers

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http://hdl.handle.net/10138/319332

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Radun , I , Radun , J , Kaistinen , J , Parkkari , I , Kecklund , G , Olivier , J & Theorell , T 2020 , ' Suicide by crashing into a heavy vehicle : A one-year follow-up study of professional drivers ' , Transportation Research. Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour , vol. 73 , pp. 318-324 . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.trf.2020.07.003

Title: Suicide by crashing into a heavy vehicle : A one-year follow-up study of professional drivers
Author: Radun, Igor; Radun, Jenni; Kaistinen, Jyrki; Parkkari, Inkeri; Kecklund, Göran; Olivier, Jake; Theorell, Töres
Contributor organization: Department of Psychology and Logopedics
Behavioural Sciences
Medicum
Date: 2020-08
Language: eng
Number of pages: 7
Belongs to series: Transportation Research. Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour
ISSN: 1369-8478
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.trf.2020.07.003
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/319332
Abstract: Train and heavy vehicle drivers can experience a traumatic event caused by people attempting suicide by crashing into their vehicles or jumping in front of them. While there are a number of studies on train drivers showing the negative consequences these events can have on their well-being, there are no studies on heavy vehicle drivers involved in these types of crashes. In the current study, we surveyed Finnish heavy vehicle drivers(N = 15) involved in a suicide crash in the year 2017 regarding their experiences and coping approximately one month (T1) and one year (T2) after the crash. Ten of these drivers reported one or various combinations of measurable consequences such as minor physical injuries, shorter or longer sickness absences, significant posttraumatic stress symptoms(measured using the Impact of Events Scale-Revised) and requiring psychological help. Posttraumatic stress symptoms decreased over time; however, three out of the four drivers who had a high IES-R score at T1 were still around the IES-R cut-off score at T2. This research raises questions whether and what kind of support heavy vehicle drivers who have been involved in a suicide crash should be given
Subject: 515 Psychology
Injuries at work
Violent suicide
Motor-vehicle crashes
PTSD
Heavy vehicle drivers
POSTTRAUMATIC-STRESS-DISORDER
TRAIN DRIVERS
ACCIDENTS
PREDICTORS
HEALTH
VETERANS
Peer reviewed: Yes
Rights: cc_by
Usage restriction: openAccess
Self-archived version: publishedVersion


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