The Effects of Presleep Slow Breathing and Music Listening on Polysomnographic Sleep Measures - a pilot trial

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Kuula , L , Halonen , R , Kajanto , K , Lipsanen , J , Makkonen , T , Peltonen , M & Pesonen , A-K 2020 , ' The Effects of Presleep Slow Breathing and Music Listening on Polysomnographic Sleep Measures - a pilot trial ' , Scientific Reports , vol. 10 , no. 1 , 7427 . https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-64218-7

Title: The Effects of Presleep Slow Breathing and Music Listening on Polysomnographic Sleep Measures - a pilot trial
Author: Kuula, Liisa; Halonen, Risto; Kajanto, Kristiina; Lipsanen, Jari; Makkonen, Tommi; Peltonen, Miina; Pesonen, Anu-Katriina
Contributor: University of Helsinki, SLEEPWELL Research Program
University of Helsinki, SLEEPWELL Research Program
University of Helsinki, Department of Psychology and Logopedics
University of Helsinki, Teachers' Academy
University of Helsinki, Department of Psychology and Logopedics
University of Helsinki, Faculty of Medicine
University of Helsinki, Department of Psychology and Logopedics
Date: 2020-05-04
Language: eng
Number of pages: 9
Belongs to series: Scientific Reports
ISSN: 2045-2322
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/319456
Abstract: Knowledge on efficient ways to reduce presleep arousal and, therefore, improve sleep, is scanty. We explored the effects of presleep slow breathing and music listening conditions on sleep quality and EEG power spectral density in young adults in a randomized, controlled trial with a crossover design. Participants’ (N = 20, 50% females) sleep was measured on two consecutive nights with polysomnography (40 nights), the other night serving as the control condition. The intervention condition was either a 30-minute slow breathing exercise or music listening (music by Max Richter: Sleep). The intervention and control conditions were placed in a random order. We measured heart rate variability prior to, during and after the intervention condition, and found that both interventions increased immediate heart rate variability. Music listening resulted in decreased N2 sleep, increased frontal beta1 power spectral density, and a trend towards increased N3 sleep was detected. In the slow breathing condition higher central delta power during N3 was observed. While some indices pointed to improved sleep quality in both intervention groups, neither condition had robust effects on sleep quality. These explorative findings warrant further replication in different populations.
Subject: HEART-RATE-VARIABILITY
QUALITY INDEX
INSOMNIA
STRESS
BIOFEEDBACK
EFFICACY
AROUSAL
WOMEN
HOME
515 Psychology
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