Changes in self-reported sleep duration with age - a 36-year longitudinal study of Finnish adults

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http://hdl.handle.net/10138/320378

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Hublin , C , Haasio , L & Kaprio , J 2020 , ' Changes in self-reported sleep duration with age - a 36-year longitudinal study of Finnish adults ' , BMC Public Health , vol. 20 , no. 1 , 1373 . https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-020-09376-z

Title: Changes in self-reported sleep duration with age - a 36-year longitudinal study of Finnish adults
Author: Hublin, Christer; Haasio, Lassi; Kaprio, Jaakko
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Department of Public Health
University of Helsinki, Department of Public Health
University of Helsinki, Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland
Date: 2020-09-09
Language: eng
Number of pages: 8
Belongs to series: BMC Public Health
ISSN: 1471-2458
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/320378
Abstract: Background: Sleep deprivation is often claimed to be increasingly common, but most studies show small changes in sleep duration over the last decades. Our aim was to analyze long-term patterns in self-reported sleep duration in a population-based cohort. Methods: Members of the Older Finnish Twin Cohort have responded to questionnaires in 1975 (N = 30,915 individuals, response rate 89%, mean age 36 years), 1981 (24,535, 84%, 41 years), 1990 (12,450, 77%, 44 years), and 2011 (8334, 72%, 60 years). Weibull regression models were used to model the effects of follow-up time and age simultaneously. Results: Sleep duration has decreased in all adult age groups and in both genders. The mean duration was in men 7.57 h in 1975 and 7.39 in 2011, and in women 7.69 and 7.37, respectively. The decrease was about 0.5 min in men and 0.9 in women per year of follow-up. In the age-group 18-34 years, mean sleep length was 7.69 h in 1975 and 7.53 in 1990. Among 35-54-year-old it was 7.57 h in 1975 and 7.34 in 2011, and in the age group of 55+ year olds 7.52 and 7.38, correspondingly. The change was largest in middle-aged group: about 23 min or about 0.6 min per year of follow-up. Conclusions: There has been a slight decrease in mean sleep duration during the 36-year follow-up. Although the sleep duration was longer in 1970s and 1980s, the probable main cause for the change in this study population is the effect of aging.
Subject: 3142 Public health care science, environmental and occupational health
Sleep length
Population
Longitudinal study
Weibull regression models
Sleep ontogeny
POOR SLEEP
TRENDS
TWIN
PREVALENCE
SYMPTOMS
COHORT
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