Intentional weight loss as a predictor of type 2 diabetes occurrence in a general adult population

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http://hdl.handle.net/10138/320520

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Sares-Jäske , L , Knekt , P , Eranti , A , Kaartinen , N E , Heliövaara , M & Männistö , S 2020 , ' Intentional weight loss as a predictor of type 2 diabetes occurrence in a general adult population ' , BMJ Open Diabetes Research & Care , vol. 8 , no. 1 , 001560 . https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjdrc-2020-001560

Title: Intentional weight loss as a predictor of type 2 diabetes occurrence in a general adult population
Author: Sares-Jäske, Laura; Knekt, Paul; Eranti, Antti; Kaartinen, Niina E.; Heliövaara, Markku; Männistö, Satu
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Department of Public Health
University of Helsinki, HYKS erva
Date: 2020-01
Language: eng
Number of pages: 13
Belongs to series: BMJ Open Diabetes Research & Care
ISSN: 2052-4897
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/320520
Abstract: Introduction Observational and intervention studies have verified that weight loss predicts a reduced type 2 diabetes (T2D) risk. At the population level, knowledge on the prediction of self-report intentional weight loss (IWL) on T2D incidence is, however, sparse. We studied the prediction of self-report IWL on T2D incidence during a 15-year follow-up in a general adult population. Research design and methods The study sample from the representative Finnish Health 2000 Survey comprised 4270 individuals, aged 30-69 years. IWL was determined with questions concerning dieting attempts and weight loss during the year prior to baseline. Incident T2D cases during a 15-year follow-up were drawn from national health registers. The strength of the association between IWL and T2D incidence was estimated with the Cox model. Results During the follow-up, 417 incident cases of T2D occurred. IWL predicted an increased risk of T2D incidence (HR 1.44; 95% CI 1.11 to 1.87, p=0.008) in a multivariable model. In interaction analyses comparing individuals with and without IWL, a suggestively elevated risk emerged in men, the younger age group, among less-educated people and in individuals with unfavorable values in several lifestyle factors. Conclusions Self-report IWL may predict an increased risk of T2D in long-term, probably due to self-implemented IWL tending to fail. The initial prevention of weight gain and support for weight maintenance after weight loss deserve greater emphasis in order to prevent T2D.
Subject: weight loss
diabetes mellitus
type 2
cohort studies
obesity
LIFE-STYLE
RISK-FACTORS
OVERWEIGHT
MELLITUS
OBESITY
PREVENTION
MORTALITY
VALIDITY
DIET
MEN
3121 Internal medicine
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