The Diapause Lipidomes of Three Closely Related Beetle Species Reveal Mechanisms for Tolerating Energetic and Cold Stress in High-Latitude Seasonal Environments

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Lehmann , P , Westberg , M , Tang , P , Lindstrom , L & Kakela , R 2020 , ' The Diapause Lipidomes of Three Closely Related Beetle Species Reveal Mechanisms for Tolerating Energetic and Cold Stress in High-Latitude Seasonal Environments ' , Frontiers in Physiology , vol. 11 , 576617 . https://doi.org/10.3389/fphys.2020.576617

Title: The Diapause Lipidomes of Three Closely Related Beetle Species Reveal Mechanisms for Tolerating Energetic and Cold Stress in High-Latitude Seasonal Environments
Author: Lehmann, Philipp; Westberg, Melissa; Tang, Patrik; Lindstrom, Leena; Kakela, Reijo
Contributor organization: Molecular and Integrative Biosciences Research Programme
Physiology and Neuroscience (-2020)
Functional Lipidomics Group
Date: 2020-09-25
Language: eng
Number of pages: 17
Belongs to series: Frontiers in Physiology
ISSN: 1664-042X
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3389/fphys.2020.576617
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/320589
Abstract: During winter insects face energetic stress driven by lack of food, and thermal stress due to sub-optimal and even lethal temperatures. To survive, most insects living in seasonal environments such as high latitudes, enter diapause, a deep resting stage characterized by a cessation of development, metabolic suppression and increased stress tolerance. The current study explores physiological adaptations related to diapause in three beetle species at high latitudes in Europe. From an ecological perspective, the comparison is interesting since one species (Leptinotarsa decemlineata) is an invasive pest that has recently expanded its range into northern Europe, where a retardation in range expansion is seen. By comparing its physiological toolkit to that of two closely related native beetles (Agelastica alniandChrysolina polita) with similar overwintering ecology and collected from similar latitude, we can study if harsh winters might be constraining further expansion. Our results suggest all species suppress metabolism during diapause and build large lipid stores before diapause, which then are used sparingly. In all species diapause is associated with temporal shifts in storage and membrane lipid profiles, mostly in accordance with the homeoviscous adaptation hypothesis, stating that low temperatures necessitate acclimation responses that increase fluidity of storage lipids, allowing their enzymatic hydrolysis, and ensure integral protein functions. Overall, the two native species had similar lipidomic profiles when compared to the invasive species, but all species showed specific shifts in their lipid profiles after entering diapause. Taken together, all three species show adaptations that improve energy saving and storage and membrane lipid fluidity during overwintering diapause. While the three species differed in the specific strategies used to increase lipid viscosity, the two native beetle species showed a more canalized lipidomic response, than the recent invader. Since close relatives with similar winter ecology can have different winter ecophysiology, extrapolations among species should be done with care. Still, range expansion of the recent invader into high latitude habitats might indeed be retarded by lack of physiological tools to manage especially thermal stress during winter, but conversely species adapted to long cold winters may face these stressors as a consequence of ongoing climate warming.
Subject: climate change
range expansion
abiotic stress
invasive species
pest insect
COLORADO POTATO BEETLE
DISCONTINUOUS GAS-EXCHANGE
DECEMLINEATA SAY COLEOPTERA
LEPTINOTARSA-DECEMLINEATA
RANGE EXPANSION
MEMBRANE-LIPIDS
METABOLIC-RATE
ECOPHYSIOLOGICAL PHASES
HOMEOVISCOUS ADAPTATION
BIOLOGICAL-MEMBRANES
1184 Genetics, developmental biology, physiology
Peer reviewed: Yes
Rights: cc_by
Usage restriction: openAccess
Self-archived version: publishedVersion


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