Potential of N2 gas flushing to hinder dairy-associated biofilm formation and extension

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Munsch-Alatossava , P & Alatossava , T 2020 , ' Potential of N2 gas flushing to hinder dairy-associated biofilm formation and extension ' , Frontiers in Microbiology , vol. 11 , 1675 . https://doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2020.01675

Title: Potential of N2 gas flushing to hinder dairy-associated biofilm formation and extension
Author: Munsch-Alatossava, Patricia; Alatossava, Tapani
Contributor organization: Department of Food and Nutrition
Helsinki Institute of Sustainability Science (HELSUS)
Tapani Alatossava / Principal Investigator
Food Sciences
Date: 2020-07-28
Language: eng
Number of pages: 14
Belongs to series: Frontiers in Microbiology
ISSN: 1664-302X
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2020.01675
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/320621
Abstract: Worldwide, the dairy sector remains of vital importance for food production despite severe environmental constraints. The production and handling conditions of milk, a rich medium, promote inevitably the entrance of microbial contaminants, with notable impact on the quality and safety of raw milk and dairy products. Moreover, the persistence of high concentrations of microorganisms (especially bacteria and bacterial spores) in biofilms (BFs) present on dairy equipment or environments constitutes an additional major source of milk contamination from pre- to post-processing stages: in dairies, BFs represent a major concern regarding the risks of disease outbreaks and are often associated with significant economic losses. One consumption trend toward "raw or low-processed foods" combined with current trends in food production systems, which tend to have more automation and longer processing runs with simultaneously more stringent microbiological requirements, necessitate the implementation of new and obligatory sustainable strategies to respond to new challenges regarding food safety. Here, in light of studies, performed mainly with raw milk, that considered dominant "planktonic" conditions, we reexamine the changes triggered by cold storage alone or combined with nitrogen gas (N-2) flushing on bacterial populations and discuss how the observed benefits of the treatment could also contribute to limiting BF formation in dairies.
Subject: 412 Animal science, dairy science
bovine milk
416 Food Science
milk
11832 Microbiology and virology
biofilm, antibacterial, N2 gas
cold chain
food spoilage
dairy
bacteria
biofilms
N(2)gas flushing
AIR-LIQUID INTERFACE
RAW-MILK
PSEUDOMONAS-AERUGINOSA
PSYCHROTROPHIC BACTERIA
ANTIBIOTIC-RESISTANCE
GROWTH
SPORULATION
PRODUCTS
PROTEIN
HOST
Peer reviewed: Yes
Rights: cc_by
Usage restriction: openAccess
Self-archived version: publishedVersion


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