Obstetric outcomes for women with severe mental illness : 10 years of experience in a tertiary multidisciplinary antenatal clinic

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http://hdl.handle.net/10138/320959

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Frayne , J , Nguyen , T , Allen , S , Hauck , Y , Liira , H & Vickery , A 2019 , ' Obstetric outcomes for women with severe mental illness : 10 years of experience in a tertiary multidisciplinary antenatal clinic ' , Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics , vol. 300 , no. 4 , pp. 889-896 . https://doi.org/10.1007/s00404-019-05258-x

Title: Obstetric outcomes for women with severe mental illness : 10 years of experience in a tertiary multidisciplinary antenatal clinic
Author: Frayne, Jacqueline; Nguyen, Thinh; Allen, Suzanna; Hauck, Yvonne; Liira, Helena; Vickery, Alistair
Other contributor: University of Helsinki, Department of General Practice and Primary Health Care


Date: 2019-10
Language: eng
Number of pages: 8
Belongs to series: Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics
ISSN: 0932-0067
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00404-019-05258-x
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/320959
Abstract: Purpose This study aims to describe 10 years of antenatal care and outcomes for women with a severe mental illness (SMI). Methods A retrospective cohort study of 420 completed pregnancy records over the last 10 years (2007-2017). Findings were compared to the Western Australian (WA) pregnancy data. Antenatal attendance, demographic, obstetric, neonatal and psychosocial variables were analysed using t tests, chi(2)(,) ANOVA and odds ratio (OR). Results Overall, women with a SMI had high rates of comorbidity (47%), antenatal complications, and preterm birth at 12.6% compared to WA mothers (p <0.001). Those with schizophrenia were at highest risk with increased risk of threatened preterm labour OR 8.25 (95% CI 4.64-14.65), gestational diabetes OR 3.59 (95% CI 2.18-5.91) and reduced likelihood of a spontaneous vaginal birth OR 0.46 (95% CI 0.29-0.71). Late presentation and antenatal attendance for women with SMI were significantly associated with maternal substance use, psychiatric admission during pregnancy, and child welfare involvement. Women with schizophrenia had significantly lower attendance rates at scheduled antenatal care (ANC) appointments than those with bipolar disease (87.1% vs 94%, p = 0.003). Conclusion Obstetric outcomes are poorer for women with SMI compared to the general population. They have higher rates of medical comorbidities, lifestyle and psychosocial risks factors that are known to contribute to poor obstetric outcomes. Effective delivery of regular and appropriate ANC is essential in addressing these multifactorial risks. Targeted strategies addressing comprehensive medical management, preterm birth prevention, lifestyle modifications and increased psychosocial support could improve both short- and long-term outcomes for these women and their children.
Subject: Antenatal care
Severe mental illness
Schizophrenia
Bipolar
PRETERM BIRTH
NEONATAL OUTCOMES
PRENATAL-CARE
PREGNANCY
SCHIZOPHRENIA
RISK
COMPLICATIONS
COHORT
3123 Gynaecology and paediatrics
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