Foraging behaviour alters with social environment in a juvenile songbird

Show full item record



Permalink

http://hdl.handle.net/10138/322235

Citation

Franks , V R , Ewen , J G , McCready , M & Thorogood , R 2020 , ' Foraging behaviour alters with social environment in a juvenile songbird ' , Proceedings of the Royal Society B. Biological Sciences , vol. 287 , no. 1939 , 20201878 . https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2020.1878

Title: Foraging behaviour alters with social environment in a juvenile songbird
Author: Franks, Victoria R.; Ewen, John G.; McCready, Mhairi; Thorogood, Rose
Other contributor: University of Helsinki, Helsinki Institute of Sustainability Science (HELSUS)


Date: 2020-11-25
Language: eng
Number of pages: 9
Belongs to series: Proceedings of the Royal Society B. Biological Sciences
ISSN: 0962-8452
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2020.1878
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/322235
Abstract: Early independence from parents is a critical period where social information acquired vertically may become outdated, or conflict with new information. However, across natural populations, it is unclear if newly independent young persist in using information from parents, or if group-level effects of conformity override previous behaviours. Here, we test if wild juvenile hihi (Notiomystis cincta, a New Zealand passerine) retain a foraging behaviour from parents, or if they change in response to the behaviour of peers. We provided feeding stations to parents during chick-rearing to seed alternative access routes, and then tracked their offspring's behaviour. Once independent, juveniles formed mixed-treatment social groups, where they did not retain preferences from their time with parents. Instead, juvenile groups converged over time to use one access route­ per group, and juveniles that moved between groups switched to copy the locally favoured option. Juvenile hihi did not copy specific individuals, even if they were more familiar with the preceding bird. Our study shows that early social experiences with parents affect initial foraging decisions, but social environments encountered later on can update transmission of arbitrary behaviours. This suggests that conformity may be widespread in animal groups, with potential cultural, ecological and evolutionary consequences.
Subject: 1181 Ecology, evolutionary biology
social information
horizontal transmission
vertical transmission
conformity
passerine
WILD POPULATION
INFORMATION
CONFORMITY
ANIMALS
TRANSMISSION
INNOVATIONS
DIFFUSION
INFERENCE
ECOLOGY
CULTURE
Rights:


Files in this item

Total number of downloads: Loading...

Files Size Format View
Franks_et_al_parents_vs_peers_author_ms.docx 619.7Kb Microsoft Word View/Open

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record