Association of exposure to Toxoplasma gondii, Epstein-Barr Virus, Herpes Simplex virus Type 1 and Cytomegalovirus with new-onset depressive and anxiety disorders: An 11-year follow-up study

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Markkula , N , Lindgren , M , Yolken , R H & Suvisaari , J 2020 , ' Association of exposure to Toxoplasma gondii, Epstein-Barr Virus, Herpes Simplex virus Type 1 and Cytomegalovirus with new-onset depressive and anxiety disorders: An 11-year follow-up study ' , Brain, Behavior, and Immunity , vol. 87 , pp. 238-242 . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bbi.2019.12.001

Title: Association of exposure to Toxoplasma gondii, Epstein-Barr Virus, Herpes Simplex virus Type 1 and Cytomegalovirus with new-onset depressive and anxiety disorders: An 11-year follow-up study
Author: Markkula, Niina; Lindgren, Maija; Yolken, Robert H.; Suvisaari, Jaana
Contributor: University of Helsinki, HUS Psychiatry
University of Helsinki, Universidad del Desarrollo
Date: 2020-07
Language: eng
Number of pages: 5
Belongs to series: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity
ISSN: 0889-1591
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/322331
Abstract: Background Some prevalent infections have been associated with common mental disorders, but there are few longitudinal studies, and results are inconsistent. We aimed to assess whether serological evidence of exposure to Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii), Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV), Herpes Simplex virus Type 1 (HSV-1) and Cytomegalovirus (CMV) predict development of new-onset depressive and anxiety disorders. Methods In a nationally representative sample of the Finnish adult population aged 30 and over (BRIF8901, n = 8028), IgG antibodies for T. gondii, EBV, HSV-1 and CMV were measured in plasma samples. The population was followed up for 11 years and new-onset depressive and anxiety disorders were diagnosed with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Associations were analysed controlling for sex, age, educational level, region of residence and marital status, and in separate analyses also for C-reactive protein level. Results Seropositivity and serointensity of the four infectious agents were not associated with an increased risk of new-onset depressive or anxiety disorders. Seropositivity for CMV at baseline was associated with a lower risk of new-onset generalized anxiety disorder (adjusted OR 0.43, 95% CI 0.22–0.86 for CMV positive persons). Conclusion The results of this large, nationally representative longitudinal study suggest that common viral infections are not significant risk factors for common mental disorders. The association of CMV with a lower risk of generalized anxiety disorder warrants further investigation.
Subject: 3112 Neurosciences
3124 Neurology and psychiatry
GENERAL-POPULATION
MOOD DISORDERS
SCHIZOPHRENIA
INDIVIDUALS
INFECTION
HEALTH
RISK
HERPESVIRUSES
PREVALENCE
SUICIDE
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