Citizenship and Socio-Political Integration: A Person-Oriented Analysis Among Russian-Speaking Minorities in Estonia, Finland and Norway

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Renvik (Mähönen) , T A , Manner , J , Vetik , R , Sam , D & Jasinskaja-Lahti , I 2020 , ' Citizenship and Socio-Political Integration: A Person-Oriented Analysis Among Russian-Speaking Minorities in Estonia, Finland and Norway ' , Journal of Social and Political Psychology , vol. 8 , no. 1 , pp. 53-77 . https://doi.org/10.5964/jspp.v8i1.1140

Title: Citizenship and Socio-Political Integration: A Person-Oriented Analysis Among Russian-Speaking Minorities in Estonia, Finland and Norway
Author: Renvik (Mähönen), Tuuli Anna; Manner, Joel; Vetik, Raivo; Sam, David; Jasinskaja-Lahti, Inga
Contributor organization: Social Psychology
Helsinki Inequality Initiative (INEQ)
Social Psychologists Studying Intergroup Relations (ESSO)
University Management
Doctoral Programme in Gender, Culture, and Society
Doctoral Programme in Social Sciences
Helsinki Institute of Sustainability Science (HELSUS)
Open University
Date: 2020
Language: eng
Number of pages: 25
Belongs to series: Journal of Social and Political Psychology
ISSN: 2195-3325
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5964/jspp.v8i1.1140
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/323605
Abstract: This survey study utilized a person-oriented approach to explore the patterns of socio-political integration among Russian-speaking minority group members in three neighboring countries in the Baltic area: Estonia (n = 482), Finland (n = 252), and Norway (n = 215). Three profiles were obtained in all countries: critical integration, separation, and assimilation. In the whole sample, critical integration was the most common acculturation profile. After the profiles were established, they were examined vis-a-vis citizenship and integration context to see, whether and to what extent, the objective (i.e., citizenship) and subjective (i.e., perceived social status and sense of belonging) socio-political integration of Russian-speakers corresponded with each other. Critical integration and separation were the most common profiles among participants holding national citizenship of the country of residence, while foreign citizenship was not related to any specific profile. Separation was rare among participants holding dual citizenship, but it was the most common profile among participants with undetermined citizenship. Also, intergroup context was associated with socio-political integration: critical integration and separation were the most common profiles of Russian-speakers in Estonia, critical integration and assimilation profiles in Finland, and assimilation profile in Norway. The results are discussed in relation to previous variable-oriented research and official integration policies of the countries studied.
Subject: ACCULTURATION ORIENTATIONS
ADAPTATION
ATTITUDES
DISCRIMINATION
DISIDENTIFICATION
DIVERSITY
IMMIGRANTS
MIGRANTS
NATIONAL IDENTIFICATION
POLITICIZED COLLECTIVE IDENTITY
acculturation
citizenship
person-oriented approach
socio-political integration
5144 Social psychology
Peer reviewed: Yes
Rights: cc_by
Usage restriction: openAccess
Self-archived version: publishedVersion


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