Cobalaminmangel bei Hund in Katze

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http://hdl.handle.net/10138/324061

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Hanisch , F , Toresson , L & Spillmann , T 2018 , ' Cobalaminmangel bei Hund in Katze ' , Tierärztliche Praxis. , vol. 46 , no. 5 , pp. 309-314 . https://doi.org/10.15654/TPK-180458

Title: Cobalaminmangel bei Hund in Katze
Author: Hanisch, Franziska; Toresson, Linda; Spillmann, Thomas
Contributor: Helsingin yliopisto, Avdelningen för klinisk häst- och smådjursmedicin
Helsingin yliopisto, Thomas Spillmann / Ansvarig forskare
Date: 2018-10
Language: deu
Number of pages: 6
Belongs to series: Tierärztliche Praxis.
ISSN: 1434-1239
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/324061
Abstract: Cobalamin is a member of the B-group of vitamins and a cofactor for metabolic processes like nucleic acid synthesis, amino acid synthesis, and the citric acid cycle. Mammals are unable to synthesize cobalamin and therefore rely on adequate food intake. Cobalamin absorption is a complex process in the stomach, duodenum, and ileum, requiring a functional exocrine pancreas. Thus, a great number of gastrointestinal diseases like chronic enteropathies, intestinal lymphoma, or exocrine pancreatic insufficiency can lead to hypocobalaminemia. Furthermore, some dog breeds (Giant Schnauzer, Border Collie, Australian Sheperd Dog, and Beagle) can have a primary, hereditary cobalamin deficiency (Imerslund-Grasbeck syndrome). Clinical signs of cobalamin deficiency comprise anorexia, vomiting, diarrhoea, failure to thrive, and neuro-pathies. Laboratory findings like non-regenerative anemia, leukopenia, hypoglycemia, and hyperammonaemia have also been described. When hypocobalaminemia is suspected usually in dogs and cats, the cobalamin concentration is usually measured by immunoassay. Because the concentrations of cobalamin in blood and cells can differ the sole measurement of the vitamin concentration is of limited informative value. Treatment depends on the underlying disease aiming at eliminating the cause of hypocobalaminemia. However, successful therapy of gastrointestinal diseases often requires an additional oral or parenteral cobalamin supplementation. In patients with Imerslund-Grasbeck syndrome, a regular and lifelong cobalamin supplementation is essential.
Subject: Vitamin B-12
hypocobalaminemia
Imerslund-Grasbeck syndrome
methyl malonic acid
homocysteine
METHYLMALONIC ACID CONCENTRATIONS
EXOCRINE PANCREATIC INSUFFICIENCY
FAILURE-TO-THRIVE
SERUM COBALAMIN
CHRONIC ENTEROPATHIES
INTRINSIC-FACTOR
SUPPLEMENTATION
MALABSORPTION
HOMOCYSTEINE
VITAMIN-B12
413 Veterinary science
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