Multidimensional plasticity in the Glanville fritillary butterfly: larval performance is temperature, host and family specific

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Verspagen , N , Ikonen , S , Saastamoinen , M & van Bergen , E 2020 , ' Multidimensional plasticity in the Glanville fritillary butterfly: larval performance is temperature, host and family specific ' , Proceedings of the Royal Society B. Biological Sciences , vol. 287 , no. 1941 , 20202577 . https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2020.2577

Title: Multidimensional plasticity in the Glanville fritillary butterfly: larval performance is temperature, host and family specific
Author: Verspagen, Nadja; Ikonen, Suvi; Saastamoinen, Marjo; van Bergen, Erik
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Helsinki Institute of Life Science HiLIFE
University of Helsinki, Evolution, Conservation, and Genomics
University of Helsinki, Helsinki Institute of Life Science HiLIFE
University of Helsinki, Helsinki Institute of Life Science HiLIFE
Date: 2020-12-23
Language: eng
Number of pages: 9
Belongs to series: Proceedings of the Royal Society B. Biological Sciences
ISSN: 0962-8452
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/324230
Abstract: Variation in environmental conditions during development can lead to changes in life-history traits with long-lasting effects. Here, we study how variation in temperature and host plant (i.e. the consequences of potential maternal oviposition choices) affects a suite of life-history traits in pre-diapause larvae of the Glanville fritillary butterfly. We focus on offspring survival, larval growth rates and relative fat reserves, and pay specific attention to intraspecific variation in the responses (G × E × E). Globally, thermal performance and survival curves varied between diets of two host plants, suggesting that host modifies the temperature impact, or vice versa. Additionally, we show that the relative fat content has a host-dependent, discontinuous response to developmental temperature. This implies that a potential switch in resource allocation, from more investment in growth at lower temperatures to storage at higher temperatures, is dependent on the larval diet. Interestingly, a large proportion of the variance in larval performance is explained by differences among families, or interactions with this variable. Finally, we demonstrate that these family-specific responses to the host plant remain largely consistent across thermal environments. Together, the results of our study underscore the importance of paying attention to intraspecific trait variation in the field of evolutionary ecology.
Subject: 1181 Ecology, evolutionary biology
developmental plasticity
G &#215
E &#215
E
intraspecific variation
temperature
nutrition
multidimensional plasticity
PHENOTYPIC PLASTICITY
LIFE-HISTORY
IRIDOID GLYCOSIDES
CLIMATE-CHANGE
PLANT SPECIFICITY
MELITAEA-CINXIA
GROWTH-RATE
EVOLUTIONARY
SIZE
ADAPTATION
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