Simultaneous allergic traits in dogs and their owners are associated with living environment, lifestyle and microbial exposures

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Lehtimaki , J , Sinkko , H , Hielm-Bjorkman , A , Laatikainen , T , Ruokolainen , L & Lohi , H 2020 , ' Simultaneous allergic traits in dogs and their owners are associated with living environment, lifestyle and microbial exposures ' , Scientific Reports , vol. 10 , 21954 . https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-79055-x

Title: Simultaneous allergic traits in dogs and their owners are associated with living environment, lifestyle and microbial exposures
Author: Lehtimaki, Jenni; Sinkko, Hanna; Hielm-Bjorkman, Anna; Laatikainen, Tiina; Ruokolainen, Lasse; Lohi, Hannes
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Medicum
University of Helsinki, HUMI - Human Microbiome Research
University of Helsinki, Equine and Small Animal Medicine
University of Helsinki, Natl Inst Hlth & Welf, Finland National Institute for Health & Welfare
University of Helsinki, Helsinki Institute of Sustainability Science (HELSUS)
University of Helsinki, Biosciences
Date: 2020-12-15
Language: eng
Number of pages: 10
Belongs to series: Scientific Reports
ISSN: 2045-2322
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/324514
Abstract: Both humans and pet dogs are more prone to develop allergies in urban than in rural environments, which has been associated with the differing microbial exposures between areas. However, potential similarities in the microbiota, that associate with environmental exposures, in allergic dogs and owners has not been investigated. We evaluated skin and gut microbiota, living environment, and lifestyle in 168 dog-owner pairs. Due to partly different manifestations of allergies between species, we focused on aeroallergen sensitized humans and dogs with owner-reported allergic symptoms. Our results agree with previous studies: dog-owner pairs suffered simultaneously from these allergic traits, higher risk associated with an urban environment, and the skin, but not gut, microbiota was partly shared by dog-owner pairs. We further discovered that urban environment homogenized both dog and human skin microbiota. Notably, certain bacterial taxa, which were associated with living environment and lifestyle, were also related with allergic traits, but these taxa differed between dogs and humans. Thus, we conclude that dogs and humans can be predisposed to allergy in response to same risk factors. However, as shared predisposing or protective bacterial taxa were not discovered, other factors than environmental microbial exposures can mediate the effect or furry dog and furless human skin select different taxa.
Subject: ANTIBODY-LEVELS
ASTHMA
RISK
SENSITIZATION
DIVERSITY
IGE
413 Veterinary science
3121 General medicine, internal medicine and other clinical medicine
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