Prognosis after Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: Influence of Psychiatric Disorders

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Marinkovic , I , Isokuortti , H , Huovinen , A , Trpeska Marinkovic , D , Mäki , K , Nybo , T T , Korvenoja , A , Raj , R , Vataja , R & Melkas , S 2020 , ' Prognosis after Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: Influence of Psychiatric Disorders ' , Brain Sciences , vol. 10 , no. 12 , 916 . https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci10120916

Title: Prognosis after Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: Influence of Psychiatric Disorders
Author: Marinkovic, Ivan; Isokuortti, Harri; Huovinen, Antti; Trpeska Marinkovic, Daniela; Mäki, Kaisa; Nybo, Taina Tuulikki; Korvenoja, Antti; Raj, Rahul; Vataja, Risto; Melkas, Susanna
Contributor: University of Helsinki, HUS Neurocenter
University of Helsinki, HUS Neurocenter
University of Helsinki, Neurologian yksikkö
University of Helsinki, HUS Psychiatry
University of Helsinki, University of Helsinki
University of Helsinki, HUS Neurocenter
University of Helsinki, Department of Diagnostics and Therapeutics
University of Helsinki, HUS Neurocenter
University of Helsinki, HUS Psychiatry
University of Helsinki, Department of Neurosciences
Date: 2020-12
Language: eng
Number of pages: 11
Belongs to series: Brain Sciences
ISSN: 2076-3425
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/324680
Abstract: Abstract: Background: We evaluated the prevalence of psychiatric disorders in mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) patients and investigated psychiatric comorbidity in relation to subjective symptoms and return to work (RTW). Methods: We recruited 103 MTBI patients (mean age 40.8 years, SD 3.1) prospectively from University Hospital. The patients were followed up for one year. The Rivermead Post-Concussion Symptom Questionnaire (RPQ) and Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOSE) were administered one month after MTBI. Three months after MTBI, any psychiatric disorders were assessed using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders. Results: Psychiatric disorders were diagnosed in 26 patients (25.2%). The most common disorders were previous/current depression. At three months, there was no dierence between patients with psychiatric disorders versus those without them in RTW (95.7% vs. 87.3%, p = 0.260) or at least in part-time work (100% vs. 94.4%, p = 0.245). In Kaplan–Meier analysis, the median time to RTW was 10 days for both groups. The median RPQ score was 13.0 (Interquartile range (IQR) 6.5–19.0) in patients with a psychiatric disorder compared to 8.5 (IQR 2.3–14.0) in those without one (p = 0.021); respectively, the median GOSE was 7.0 (IQR 7.0–8.0) compared to 8.0 (IQR 7.0–8.0, p = 0.003). Conclusions: Approximately every fourth patient with MTBI had a psychiatric disorder. These patients reported more symptoms, and their functional outcome measured with GOSE at one month after MTBI was worse. However, presence of any psychiatric disorder did not aect RTW. Early contact and adequate follow-up are important when supporting the patient’s return to work.
Subject: ANXIETY
ASSOCIATION
DEPRESSION
HEAD-INJURY
HEALTH
OUTCOMES
RETURN
SEQUELAE
WORK
brain concussion
mental disorders
post-concussion symptoms
return to work
3112 Neurosciences
3124 Neurology and psychiatry
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