Education as a moderator of genetic risk for higher body mass index: prospective cohort study from childhood to adulthood

Show full item record



Permalink

http://hdl.handle.net/10138/324797

Citation

Komulainen , K , Pulkki-Raback , L , Jokela , M , Lyytikäinen , LP , Pitkänen , N , Laitinen , T , Hintsanen , M , Elovainio , M , Hintsa , T & Jula , A 2018 , ' Education as a moderator of genetic risk for higher body mass index: prospective cohort study from childhood to adulthood ' , International Journal of Obesity , vol. 42 , no. 4 , pp. 866-871 . https://doi.org/10.1038/ijo.2017.174

Title: Education as a moderator of genetic risk for higher body mass index: prospective cohort study from childhood to adulthood
Author: Komulainen, K; Pulkki-Raback, L; Jokela, M; Lyytikäinen, LP; Pitkänen, N; Laitinen, T; Hintsanen, M; Elovainio, M; Hintsa, T; Jula, A
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Department of Psychology and Logopedics
University of Helsinki, Department of Psychology and Logopedics
University of Helsinki, Department of Psychology and Logopedics
University of Helsinki, University Management
University of Helsinki, Department of Psychology and Logopedics
University of Helsinki, Behavioural Sciences
Date: 2018
Language: eng
Number of pages: 6
Belongs to series: International Journal of Obesity
ISSN: 0307-0565
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/324797
Abstract: Objectives:The life-course development of body mass index (BMI) may be driven by interactions between genes and obesity-inducing social environments. We examined whether lower parental or own education accentuates the genetic risk for higher BMI over the life course, and whether diet and physical activity account for the educational differences in genetic associations with BMI.Subjects/Methods:The study comprised 2441 participants (1319 women, 3-18 years at baseline) from the prospective, population-based Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study. BMI (kg/m 2) trajectories were calculated from 18 to 49 years, using data from six time points spanning 31 years. A polygenic risk score for BMI was calculated as a weighted sum of risk alleles in 97 single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Education was assessed via self-reports, measured prospectively from participants in adulthood and from parents when participants were children. Diet and physical activity were self-reported in adulthood.Results:Mean BMI increased from 22.6 to 26.6 kg/m 2 during the follow-up. In growth curve analyses, the genetic risk score was associated with faster BMI increase over time (b=0.02, (95% CI, 0.01-0.02, P
Subject: adolescent
adult
adulthood
allele
Article
body mass
child
childhood
cohort analysis
controlled study
educational status
female
follow up
genetic association
genetic risk
human
major clinical study
male
middle aged
obesity
physical activity
priority journal
prospective study
self report
3141 Health care science
5141 Sociology
Rights:


Files in this item

Total number of downloads: Loading...

Files Size Format View
komulainen2018ijo.pdf 359.0Kb PDF View/Open

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record