Academic Well-Being and Structural Characteristics of Peer Networks in School

Show full item record



Permalink

http://hdl.handle.net/10138/324861

Citation

Rimpela , A , Kinnunen , J M , Lindfors , P , Soto , V E , Salmela-Aro , K , Perelman , J , Federico , B & Lorant , V 2020 , ' Academic Well-Being and Structural Characteristics of Peer Networks in School ' , International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health , vol. 17 , no. 8 , 2848 . https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17082848

Title: Academic Well-Being and Structural Characteristics of Peer Networks in School
Author: Rimpela, Arja; Kinnunen, Jaana M.; Lindfors, Pirjo; Soto, Victoria Eugenia; Salmela-Aro, Katariina; Perelman, Julian; Federico, Bruno; Lorant, Vincent
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Department of Education
Date: 2020-04
Language: eng
Number of pages: 14
Belongs to series: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
ISSN: 1661-7827
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/324861
Abstract: Peer networks at school and students' position in these networks can influence their academic well-being. We study here individual students' network position (isolation, popularity, social activity) and peer network structures at the school level (centralization, density, clustering, school connectedness) and their relations to students' academic well-being (school burnout, SB; schoolwork engagement, SE). Classroom surveys for 14-16-year-olds (N = 11,015) were conducted in six European cities (SILNE survey). Students were asked to nominate up to five schoolmates with whom they preferred to do schoolwork. SB and SE correlated negatively (-0.32; p <0.0001). Students had on average 3.4 incoming (popularity; range 0-5) and 3.4 outgoing (social activity; 0-5) social ties. Percentage of isolated students was 1.4. Students' network position was associated weakly with academic well-being-popular students had less SB and higher SE, and socially active students had higher SE. School-level peer networks showed high clustering and school connectedness, but low density and low centralization. Clustering was associated with higher SB. Low centralization and high school connectedness protected from SB. Dense networks supported SE as did high average school connectedness. Correlations between these network indicators and academic well-being were, however, low. Our study showed that both students' network position and network characteristics at the school level can influence adolescents' academic well-being.
Subject: adolescents
peers
school burnout
schoolwork engagement
social network analysis
ADOLESCENT CIGARETTE-SMOKING
FRIENDSHIP NETWORKS
DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS
ENGAGEMENT
BURNOUT
CONTEXT
SOCIALIZATION
SELECTION
SCHOOLCHILDREN
TRAJECTORIES
1172 Environmental sciences
1181 Ecology, evolutionary biology
3142 Public health care science, environmental and occupational health
Rights:


Files in this item

Total number of downloads: Loading...

Files Size Format View
ijerph_17_02848.pdf 373.3Kb PDF View/Open

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record