Was There a Balance of Power System in the Ancient Near East?

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Aissaoui , A 2019 , ' Was There a Balance of Power System in the Ancient Near East? ' , Diplomacy & Statecraft , vol. 30 , no. 3 , pp. 421-442 . https://doi.org/10.1080/09592296.2019.1641916

Title: Was There a Balance of Power System in the Ancient Near East?
Author: Aissaoui, Alex
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Centre of Excellence in Ancient Near Eastern Empires (ANEE)
Date: 2019-08-20
Language: eng
Number of pages: 22
Belongs to series: Diplomacy & Statecraft
ISSN: 0959-2296
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/326820
Abstract: Although first explicitly coined in Renaissance Italy, the notion of a 'balance of power' - the conduct of state actors to meet the logics of power balancing - goes back to pre-modern times. Traditionally, scholars have looked to the Punic Wars and the early modern period as early evidence for the balance. However, the ancient Near East during the second-millennium BC has received far less attention. Yet Western Asia existed as an international arena of states fully integrated in a system based on interdependence and power balancing. In the field of International Relations, systematic analyses of this phase in world history remain under-developed. Accordingly, the question of when a systemic environment for the balancing behaviour existed for the first time has been addressed less in International Relations theory where the literature leans primarily on the European experience.
Subject: 517 Political science
balance of power, ancient Mediterranean, Punic Wars, ancient Near East, International Relations theory
INTERNATIONAL SYSTEM
HISTORY
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