Early gender differences in emotional expressions and self-regulation in settings of early childhood education and care

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Veijalainen , J , Reunamo , J & Heikkilä , M 2021 , ' Early gender differences in emotional expressions and self-regulation in settings of early childhood education and care ' , Early Child Development and Care , vol. 191 , no. 2 , pp. 173-186 . https://doi.org/10.1080/03004430.2019.1611045

Title: Early gender differences in emotional expressions and self-regulation in settings of early childhood education and care
Author: Veijalainen, Jouni; Reunamo, Jyrki; Heikkilä, Minna
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Teacher Education
University of Helsinki, Department of Education
Date: 2021-01-25
Language: eng
Number of pages: 14
Belongs to series: Early Child Development and Care
ISSN: 0300-4430
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/326898
Abstract: This paper aims to determine possible gender differences in children’s observed emotional expressions and their relationship with teacher-rated self-regulation (SR) skills in the setting of early childhood education and care (ECEC). Supporting SR and emotional wellbeing in early childhood can be considered a favourable pathway towards holistic development (e.g. Shonkoff et al. [2012]. The lifelong effects of early childhood adversity and toxic stress. Pediatrics, 129(1), e232–e246; Bagdi & Vacca [2005]. Supporting early childhood social-emotional well being: The building blocks for early learning and school success. Early Childhood Education Journal, 33(3), 145–150). The participants included 1213 (44.2%) boys and 1075 (41.0%) girls which were 13–83 months old. The SR data was collected through an evaluation instrument. Emotional expressions (N = 50480) were observed with an independent instrument. The results indicated how girls were observed to have more neutral, calm or peaceful-related emotional expressions, while boys tended to express more surprise, curiosity, anger or frustration-related emotions. Boys’ and girls’ ability for SR was related to their emotional expressions. Boys’ and girls’ SR skills had the same tendency in weak, moderate and good SR categories.
Subject: 516 Educational sciences
515 Psychology
Self-regulation
emotional expression
emotions
early childhood
EFFORTFUL CONTROL
BEHAVIOR
TEMPERAMENT
ANTECEDENTS
PERSONALITY
PREDICTORS
ADVERSITY
HEALTH
ANGER
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