The Contribution of Neighborhood Socioeconomic Disadvantage to Depressive Symptoms Over the Course of Adult Life : A 32-Year Prospective Cohort Study

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Elovainio , M , Vahtera , J , Pentti , J , Hakulinen , C , Pulkki-Råback , L , Lipsanen , J , Virtanen , M , Keltikangas-Järvinen , L , Kivimäki , M , Kähönen , M , Viikari , J , Lehtimäki , T & Raitakari , O 2020 , ' The Contribution of Neighborhood Socioeconomic Disadvantage to Depressive Symptoms Over the Course of Adult Life : A 32-Year Prospective Cohort Study ' , American Journal of Epidemiology , vol. 189 , no. 7 , pp. 679-689 . https://doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwaa026

Title: The Contribution of Neighborhood Socioeconomic Disadvantage to Depressive Symptoms Over the Course of Adult Life : A 32-Year Prospective Cohort Study
Author: Elovainio, Marko; Vahtera, Jussi; Pentti, Jaana; Hakulinen, Christian; Pulkki-Råback, Laura; Lipsanen, Jari; Virtanen, Marianna; Keltikangas-Järvinen, Liisa; Kivimäki, Mika; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Lehtimäki, Terho; Raitakari, Olli
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Department of Psychology and Logopedics
University of Helsinki, Helsinki Inequality Initiative (INEQ)
University of Helsinki, Doctoral Programme in Cognition, Learning, Instruction and Communication
University of Helsinki, Doctoral Programme in Cognition, Learning, Instruction and Communication
University of Helsinki, Medicum
University of Helsinki, Department of Public Health
Date: 2020-07
Language: eng
Number of pages: 11
Belongs to series: American Journal of Epidemiology
ISSN: 0002-9262
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/328673
Abstract: The association between socioeconomic disadvantage and increased risk of depressive symptoms in adulthood is well established. We tested 1) the contribution of early exposure to neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage to later depressive symptoms throughout life, 2) the persistence of the potential association between early exposure and depressive symptoms, and 3) the contributions of other known risk factors to the association. Data were collected from the Young Finns Study, a prospective, population-based 32-year follow-up study that included participants aged 3-18 years at baseline in 1980. Participants were followed up with repeated measurements of depressive symptoms between 1992 and 2012 (n = 2,788) and linked to national grid data on neighborhood disadvantage via residential addresses. We examined the associations in mixed models separately for the 5-, 10-, 15-, and 20-year follow-ups. Living in a disadvantaged neighborhood during childhood and adolescence was associated with a higher level of depressive symptoms in adulthood during all follow-up periods (beta = 0.07, P = 0.001) than living in a nondisadvantaged area. Individual adulthood socioeconomic status mediated the associations. These findings suggest that living in a socioeconomically disadvantaged area during childhood and adolescence has a long-lasting negative association with mental health irrespective of family-related risks, partially due to socioeconomic adversity later in life.
Subject: depression
geographical area
mediation
neighborhood
population-based studies
risk factors
INTIMA-MEDIA THICKNESS
MAJOR DEPRESSION
CARDIOVASCULAR RISK
CUMULATIVE ADVANTAGE
MINOR DEPRESSION
MENTAL-DISORDER
SOCIAL SUPPORT
CHILDHOOD
CAUSAL
HEALTH
3142 Public health care science, environmental and occupational health
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