Efficient alkane oxidation under combustion engine and atmospheric conditions

Show full item record



Permalink

http://hdl.handle.net/10138/328831

Citation

Wang , Z , Ehn , M , Rissanen , M P , Garmash , O , Quelever , L , Xing , L , Monge-Palacios , M , Rantala , P , Donahue , N M , Berndt , T & Sarathy , S M 2021 , ' Efficient alkane oxidation under combustion engine and atmospheric conditions ' , Communications chemistry , vol. 4 , no. 1 , 18 . https://doi.org/10.1038/s42004-020-00445-3

Title: Efficient alkane oxidation under combustion engine and atmospheric conditions
Author: Wang, Zhandong; Ehn, Mikael; Rissanen, Matti P.; Garmash, Olga; Quelever, Lauriane; Xing, Lili; Monge-Palacios, Manuel; Rantala, Pekka; Donahue, Neil M.; Berndt, Torsten; Sarathy, S. Mani
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Institute for Atmospheric and Earth System Research (INAR)
University of Helsinki, INAR Physics
University of Helsinki, INAR Physics
University of Helsinki, INAR Physics
University of Helsinki, Institute for Atmospheric and Earth System Research (INAR)
Date: 2021-02-18
Number of pages: 8
Belongs to series: Communications chemistry
ISSN: 2399-3669
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/328831
Abstract: Efficient autoxidation of organic compounds typically requires that they possess double bonds or oxygen-containing moieties, which is why alkanes were thought to contribute little to atmospheric organic aerosol formation. Here, mass spectrometry shows significant autoxidation of alkanes under both atmospheric and combustion conditions. Oxidation chemistry controls both combustion processes and the atmospheric transformation of volatile emissions. In combustion engines, radical species undergo isomerization reactions that allow fast addition of O-2. This chain reaction, termed autoxidation, is enabled by high engine temperatures, but has recently been also identified as an important source for highly oxygenated species in the atmosphere, forming organic aerosol. Conventional knowledge suggests that atmospheric autoxidation requires suitable structural features, like double bonds or oxygen-containing moieties, in the precursors. With neither of these functionalities, alkanes, the primary fuel type in combustion engines and an important class of urban trace gases, are thought to have minor susceptibility to extensive autoxidation. Here, utilizing state-of-the-art mass spectrometry, measuring both radicals and oxidation products, we show that alkanes undergo autoxidation much more efficiently than previously thought, both under atmospheric and combustion conditions. Even at high concentrations of NOX, which typically rapidly terminates autoxidation in urban areas, the studied C-6-C-10 alkanes produce considerable amounts of highly oxygenated products that can contribute to urban organic aerosol. The results of this inter-disciplinary effort provide crucial information on oxidation processes in both combustion engines and the atmosphere, with direct implications for engine efficiency and urban air quality.
Subject: 114 Physical sciences
Rights:


Files in this item

Total number of downloads: Loading...

Files Size Format View
s42004_020_00445_3.pdf 1.692Mb PDF View/Open

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record