Visual Perceptual Skills in Very Preterm Children : Developmental Course and Associations With Neural Activation

Show full item record



Permalink

http://hdl.handle.net/10138/329544

Citation

PIPARI Study Grp , Lind , A , Parkkola , R , Laasonen , M , Vorobyev , V & Haataja , L 2020 , ' Visual Perceptual Skills in Very Preterm Children : Developmental Course and Associations With Neural Activation ' , Pediatric Neurology , vol. 109 , pp. 72-78 . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pediatrneurol.2020.04.012

Title: Visual Perceptual Skills in Very Preterm Children : Developmental Course and Associations With Neural Activation
Author: PIPARI Study Grp; Lind, Annika; Parkkola, Riitta; Laasonen, Marja; Vorobyev, Victor; Haataja, Leena
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Department of Psychology and Logopedics
University of Helsinki, HUS Children and Adolescents
Date: 2020-08
Language: eng
Number of pages: 7
Belongs to series: Pediatric Neurology
ISSN: 0887-8994
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/329544
Abstract: Background: The objective of this study was to examine how nonverbal skills at age five years relate to visual perception and brain activation during visual perception tasks at age 12 years in very preterm subjects without visual or other neurodevelopmental impairments or major brain pathologies. Methods: At age five years, 36 prematurely born (birth weight Results: Test performance at age five years was significantly poorer in the very preterm group than the control subjects, but at age 12 years performance was similar in both groups. In the very preterm group, better nonverbal skills at age five years were significantly associated with stronger neural activation during the visual perception task at age 12 years. No associations between nonverbal skills at age five years and brain activation at age 12 years appeared in the control group. Conclusions: The associations between better nonverbal skills and stronger neural activation during visual perception task only observed in the very preterm group may reflect delayed development of the visual perception network and/or prematurity-related neural plasticity. The developmental follow-up of very preterm children should include psychological assessment of nonverbal skills at least until age five years. (C) 2020 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Subject: Prematurity
Visual perception
fMRI
Developmental follow-up
LOW-BIRTH-WEIGHT
ADOLESCENTS BORN
YOUNG-ADULTS
OUTCOMES
MEMORY
AGE
3112 Neurosciences
3124 Neurology and psychiatry
3123 Gynaecology and paediatrics
Rights:


Files in this item

Total number of downloads: Loading...

Files Size Format View
Lind_et_al_Pediatric_Neurology_8.4.2020.pdf 671.2Kb PDF View/Open

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record