Socio-Economic Context and Community Resilience among the People Involved in Fish Drying Practices in the South-East Coast of Bangladesh

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http://hdl.handle.net/10138/330862

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Mitu, S.J.; Schneider, P.; Islam, M.S.; Alam, M.; Mozumder, M.M.H.; Hossain, M.M.; Shamsuzzaman, M.M. Socio-Economic Context and Community Resilience among the People Involved in Fish Drying Practices in the South-East Coast of Bangladesh. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 6242.

Title: Socio-Economic Context and Community Resilience among the People Involved in Fish Drying Practices in the South-East Coast of Bangladesh
Author: Mitu, Sabrina Jannat; Schneider, Petra; Islam, Md. Shahidul; Alam, Masud; Mozumder, Mohammad Mojibul Hoque; Hossain, Mohammad Mosarof; Shamsuzzaman, Md. Mostafa
Publisher: Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Date: 2021-06-09
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/330862
Abstract: The south-east coast, specifically the Cox’s Bazar region, of Bangladesh has achieved a tremendous impetus for producing a large volume of dried fish by involving thousands of marginalized coastal people. This study aimed to assess the socio-economic profile, livelihood strategies, and resilience of the communities engaged in fish drying on the south-east coast using a mixed-methods approach and an Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP). The study’s findings revealed that communities involved in drying were socio-economically undeveloped due to their lower literacy, unstable incomes, and labor-intensive occupations. Apart from notable child labor employed in fish drying in Nazirertek, female workers had relatively higher participation than males. Nevertheless, the female workers had less control over their daily wages and reported working at USD 3.54–5.89 per day, which was relatively lower than male workers who received USD 4.15–8.31 per day. Through fish drying activities, very few workers, producers, and traders were found to be self-reliant. In contrast, the livelihoods of the workers were not as secure as the processors and traders. In addition to suffering from various shocks and constraints, dried fish processors and workers, dried fish traders, off-season income, an abundance of fish species, fish drying facilities, trader’s association, and social interrelationship played a significant role in maintaining community resilience. The study recommends appropriate interventions to alternative income diversification options, strong collaboration between communities, local authorities, and government for sustainable livelihoods and better community resilience.


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