Typologies of Family Functioning and 24-h Movement Behaviors

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http://hdl.handle.net/10138/331449

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Guerrero , M D , Barnes , J D , Tremblay , M S & Pulkki-Råback , L 2021 , ' Typologies of Family Functioning and 24-h Movement Behaviors ' , International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health , vol. 18 , no. 2 , 699 . https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18020699

Title: Typologies of Family Functioning and 24-h Movement Behaviors
Author: Guerrero, Michelle D.; Barnes, Joel D.; Tremblay, Mark S.; Pulkki-Råback, Laura
Contributor organization: Department of Psychology and Logopedics
Psychosocial factors and health
Date: 2021-01
Language: eng
Number of pages: 10
Belongs to series: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
ISSN: 1661-7827
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18020699
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/331449
Abstract: Research on the importance of the family environment on children's health behaviors is ubiquitous, yet critical gaps in the literature exist. Many studies have focused on one family characteristic and have relied on variable-centered approaches as opposed to person-centered approaches (e.g., latent profile analysis). The purpose of the current study was to use latent profile analysis to identify family typologies characterized by parental acceptance, parental monitoring, and family conflict, and to examine whether such typologies are associated with the number of movement behavior recommendations (i.e., physical activity, screen time, and sleep) met by children. Data for this cross-sectional observational study were part of the baseline data from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) study. Data were collected across 21 study sites in the United States. Participants included 10,712 children (female = 5143, males = 5578) aged 9 and 10 years (M = 9.91, SD = 0.62). Results showed that children were meaningfully classified into one of five family typologies. Children from families with high acceptance, medium monitoring, and medium conflict (P2; OR = 0.54; 95% CI, 0.39-0.76); high acceptance, medium monitoring, and high conflict (P3; OR = 0.28; 95% CI, 0.20, 0.40); low acceptance, low monitoring, and medium conflict (P4; OR = 0.24; 95% CI, 0.16, 0.36); and medium acceptance, low monitoring, and high conflict (P5; OR = 0.19; 95% CI, 0.12-0.29) were less likely to meet all three movement behavior recommendations compared to children from families with high acceptance, high monitoring, and low conflict (P1). These findings highlight the importance of the family environment for promoting healthy movement behaviors among children.
Subject: children
family environment
latent profile analysis
physical activity
screen time
sleep
515 Psychology
Peer reviewed: Yes
Rights: cc_by
Usage restriction: openAccess
Self-archived version: publishedVersion


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