New evidence for the importance of soil nitrogen on the survival and adaptation of silver birch to climate warming

Show full item record



Permalink

http://hdl.handle.net/10138/331598

Citation

Possen , B J H M , Rousi , M , Keski-Saari , S , Silfver , T , Kontunen-Soppela , S , Oksanen , E & Mikola , J 2021 , ' New evidence for the importance of soil nitrogen on the survival and adaptation of silver birch to climate warming ' , Ecosphere , vol. 12 , no. 5 , 03520 . https://doi.org/10.1002/ecs2.3520

Title: New evidence for the importance of soil nitrogen on the survival and adaptation of silver birch to climate warming
Author: Possen, Boy J. H. M.; Rousi, M.; Keski-Saari, Sarita; Silfver, Tarja; Kontunen-Soppela, S.; Oksanen, Elina; Mikola, Juha
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Ecosystems and Environment Research Programme
University of Helsinki, Ecosystems and Environment Research Programme
Date: 2021-05
Language: eng
Number of pages: 26
Belongs to series: Ecosphere
ISSN: 2150-8925
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/331598
Abstract: Strong seasonality in the subarctic causes unfavorable conditions for plant growth driving strong latitudinal clines in growth onset and cessation related to temperature and photoperiodic cues. Results from controlled experiments indeed show such clines, but results from field experiments seem to indicate that such clines may depend on site characteristics, suggesting that environmental variation, other than temperature and photoperiod, is relevant under climate change. Here, we increase our understanding of the effects of climate change on survival, height growth, and the phenological cycle by investigating their inter- and intrapopulation variation using three common gardens and six silver birch (Betula pendula) populations (each represented by up to five cloned genotypes) spanning the Finnish subarctic. We found clinal south-north variation among populations in survival and growth and in spring and autumn phenology to be largely absent. Sapling survival decreased with a transfer of over five degrees of latitude southward, but growth and phenology showed little evidence for adaptation to the local climate. Instead, ample genetic variation and plastic responses were found for all traits studied. Higher soil N availability increased sapling survival and growth, and phenology seemed to be adapted to soil N and day length rather than to temperature. Our results suggest that the climatic conditions predicted for the end of this century may, at least for poor soils, reduce the survival of northern silver birch trees in their early growth. However, those saplings that survive seem to have sufficient phenotypic plasticity to acclimatize to the changing climate. Along with climate, soil fertility plays a significant role and clearly warrants inclusion in the future tests of the effects of climate warming on tree growth and survival.
Subject: climate change
common garden
height growth
local adaptation
silver birch
soil nitrogen
BETULA-PENDULA ROTH
BUD BURST
PLANT PHENOLOGY
LEAF PHENOLOGY
GENE FLOW
GROWTH
TEMPERATURE
RESPONSES
TREES
POPULATION
1181 Ecology, evolutionary biology
Rights:


Files in this item

Total number of downloads: Loading...

Files Size Format View
ecs2.3520.pdf 2.583Mb PDF View/Open

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record