Health behaviour among bilingual Swedish speaking patients in the Finnish healthcare setting

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http://hdl.handle.net/10138/331882

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Mustajoki , M , Eriksson , J G & Forsen , T 2020 , ' Health behaviour among bilingual Swedish speaking patients in the Finnish healthcare setting ' , Journal of family medicine and primary care , vol. 9 , no. 8 , pp. 4045-4052 . https://doi.org/10.4103/jfmpc.jfmpc_317_20

Title: Health behaviour among bilingual Swedish speaking patients in the Finnish healthcare setting
Author: Mustajoki, Marianne; Eriksson, Johan G.; Forsen, Tom
Contributor organization: Department of General Practice and Primary Health Care
University of Helsinki
Clinicum
Research Programs Unit
Johan Eriksson / Principal Investigator
HUS Helsinki and Uusimaa Hospital District
Date: 2020-08
Language: eng
Number of pages: 8
Belongs to series: Journal of family medicine and primary care
ISSN: 2249-4863
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4103/jfmpc.jfmpc_317_20
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/331882
Abstract: Objective: We assessed the prevalence and consequences of discordant language communication between bilingual Swedish speaking emergency patients and general practitioners (GPs) in Finnish healthcare. We compared the results with Finnish speaking emergency patients provided with language concordant healthcare. Materials and Methods: A researcher-designed questionnaire was used to collect data about both Swedish and Finnish speaking emergency patients' health and socioeconomic status, reason for emergency visits and use of healthcare. Furthermore, the Swedish speakers' nonnative language proficiency and preferred communication language were examined. The study was performed in 16 healthcare centers and outpatient departments in bilingual regions in Finland. Results: The Swedish speakers (n = 139) visited healthcare centers less than the Finnish speakers (n = 736) (P = 0.001) and communicated less frequently with the GP in their native language (P < 0.001). The Swedish speakers more often planned to revisit their assigned GP (P < 0.001) after the emergency visit. No differences in health conditions and socioeconomic status between the language groups were observed. Conclusion: Although Swedish and Finnish speaking emergency patients report a similar prevalence of chronic noncommunicable diseases, Swedish speakers make fewer annual visits to a physician. We suggest that discordant language communication might relate to decreased healthcare visits among bilingual Swedish speaking emergency patients.
Subject: Bilingual
discordant language communication
emergency visit
COMMUNICATION
DOCTOR
CONTINUITY
3121 General medicine, internal medicine and other clinical medicine
Peer reviewed: Yes
Usage restriction: openAccess
Self-archived version: publishedVersion


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