Fecal microbiota transplantation in human metabolic diseases: From a murky past to a bright future?

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Hanssen , N M J , Vos de , W M & Nieuwdorp , M 2021 , ' Fecal microbiota transplantation in human metabolic diseases: From a murky past to a bright future? ' , Cell Metabolism , vol. 33 , no. 6 , pp. 1098-1110 . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cmet.2021.05.005

Title: Fecal microbiota transplantation in human metabolic diseases: From a murky past to a bright future?
Author: Hanssen, Nordin M. J.; Vos de, Willem Meindert; Nieuwdorp, Max
Contributor organization: Department of Bacteriology and Immunology
Willem Meindert Vos de / Principal Investigator
de Vos & Salonen group
HUMI - Human Microbiome Research
Faculty of Medicine
University of Helsinki
Date: 2021-06-01
Language: eng
Number of pages: 13
Belongs to series: Cell Metabolism
ISSN: 1550-4131
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cmet.2021.05.005
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/332366
Abstract: Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is gaining considerable traction as a therapeutic approach to influence the course of a plethora of chronic conditions, ranging from metabolic syndrome and malignancies to auto-immune and neurological diseases, and helped to establish the contribution of the gut microbiome to these conditions. Although FMT procedures have yielded important mechanistic insights, their use in clinical practice may be limited due to practical objections in the setting of metabolic diseases. While its applicability is established to treat recurrent Clostridiodes difficile, FMT is emerging in ulcerative colitis and various other diseases. A particularly new insight is that FMTs may not only alter insulin sensitivity but may also alter the course of type 1 diabetes by attenuating underlying auto-immunity. In this review, we will outline the major principles and pitfalls of FMT and where optimization of study design and the procedure itself will further advance the field of cardiometabolic medicine.
Subject: 3111 Biomedicine
1182 Biochemistry, cell and molecular biology
INTESTINAL MICROBIOTA
ULCERATIVE-COLITIS
INSULIN SENSITIVITY
DONOR FECES
REMISSION
EFFICACY
INFECTION
INSIGHTS
SMOKING
CELLS
Peer reviewed: Yes
Rights: cc_by
Usage restriction: openAccess
Self-archived version: publishedVersion


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