Vanillic acid and methoxyhydroquinone production from guaiacyl units and related aromatic compounds using Aspergillus niger cell factories

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dc.contributor.author Lubbers, Ronnie J. M.
dc.contributor.author Dilokpimol, Adiphol
dc.contributor.author Nousiainen, Paula A.
dc.contributor.author Cioc, Razvan C.
dc.contributor.author Visser, Jaap
dc.contributor.author Bruijnincx, Pieter C. A.
dc.contributor.author de Vries, Ronald P.
dc.date.accessioned 2021-08-19T05:58:01Z
dc.date.available 2021-08-19T05:58:01Z
dc.date.issued 2021-08-03
dc.identifier.citation Lubbers , R J M , Dilokpimol , A , Nousiainen , P A , Cioc , R C , Visser , J , Bruijnincx , P C A & de Vries , R P 2021 , ' Vanillic acid and methoxyhydroquinone production from guaiacyl units and related aromatic compounds using Aspergillus niger cell factories ' , Microbial Cell Factories , vol. 20 , no. 1 , 151 . https://doi.org/10.1186/s12934-021-01643-x
dc.identifier.other PURE: 167710543
dc.identifier.other PURE UUID: 3a758750-a08a-4420-a980-3650cd601b39
dc.identifier.other WOS: 000683469100001
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10138/333299
dc.description.abstract Background The aromatic compounds vanillin and vanillic acid are important fragrances used in the food, beverage, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries. Currently, most aromatic compounds used in products are chemically synthesized, while only a small percentage is extracted from natural sources. The metabolism of vanillin and vanillic acid has been studied for decades in microorganisms and many studies have been conducted that showed that both can be produced from ferulic acid using bacteria. In contrast, the degradation of vanillin and vanillic acid by fungi is poorly studied and no genes involved in this metabolic pathway have been identified. In this study, we aimed to clarify this metabolic pathway in Aspergillus niger and identify the genes involved. Results Using whole-genome transcriptome data, four genes involved in vanillin and vanillic acid metabolism were identified. These include vanillin dehydrogenase (vdhA), vanillic acid hydroxylase (vhyA), and two genes encoding novel enzymes, which function as methoxyhydroquinone 1,2-dioxygenase (mhdA) and 4-oxo-monomethyl adipate esterase (omeA). Deletion of these genes in A. niger confirmed their role in aromatic metabolism and the enzymatic activities of these enzymes were verified. In addition, we demonstrated that mhdA and vhyA deletion mutants can be used as fungal cell factories for the accumulation of vanillic acid and methoxyhydroquinone from guaiacyl lignin units and related aromatic compounds. Conclusions This study provides new insights into the fungal aromatic metabolic pathways involved in the degradation of guaiacyl units and related aromatic compounds. The identification of the involved genes unlocks new potential for engineering aromatic compound-producing fungal cell factories. en
dc.format.extent 14
dc.language.iso eng
dc.relation.ispartof Microbial Cell Factories
dc.rights cc_by
dc.rights.uri info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.subject 4-Hydroxy-6-methoxy-6-oxohexa-2
dc.subject 4-dienoic acid
dc.subject 4-Oxo-monomethyl adipate
dc.subject Coniferyl alcohol
dc.subject Ferulic acid
dc.subject Fungal cell factory
dc.subject Lignin
dc.subject Vanillin
dc.subject Veratic acid
dc.subject FERULIC ACID
dc.subject MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION
dc.subject GENE-CLUSTER
dc.subject METABOLISM
dc.subject IDENTIFICATION
dc.subject BIOCONVERSION
dc.subject CATABOLISM
dc.subject HYDROXYLASE
dc.subject DEGRADATION
dc.subject PERFORMANCE
dc.subject 116 Chemical sciences
dc.title Vanillic acid and methoxyhydroquinone production from guaiacyl units and related aromatic compounds using Aspergillus niger cell factories en
dc.type Article
dc.contributor.organization Department of Chemistry
dc.description.reviewstatus Peer reviewed
dc.relation.doi https://doi.org/10.1186/s12934-021-01643-x
dc.relation.issn 1475-2859
dc.rights.accesslevel openAccess
dc.type.version publishedVersion

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