Does the Early Bird Catch the Worm? Earliness of Students' Work and its Relationship with Course Outcomes

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http://hdl.handle.net/10138/333458

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Leinonen , J , Castro , F E V & Hellas , A 2021 , Does the Early Bird Catch the Worm? Earliness of Students' Work and its Relationship with Course Outcomes . in ITiCSE '21: Proceedings of the 26th ACM Conference on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education V. 1 . ACM , New York, United States , pp. 373-379 , Annual Conference on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education , Paderborn , Germany , 28/06/2021 . https://doi.org/10.1145/3430665.3456383

Title: Does the Early Bird Catch the Worm? Earliness of Students' Work and its Relationship with Course Outcomes
Author: Leinonen, Juho; Castro, Francisco Enrique Vicente; Hellas, Arto
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Department of Computer Science
University of Helsinki, Aalto University
Publisher: ACM
Date: 2021-06-26
Language: eng
Number of pages: 7
Belongs to series: ITiCSE '21: Proceedings of the 26th ACM Conference on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education V. 1
ISBN: 978-1-4503-8214-4
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/333458
Abstract: Intuitively, it seems plausible that students who start their work earlier and work on more days than their peers should perform better in any course. But does the early bird really catch the worm? In this article, we examine introductory programming students' time management behavior as evidenced by data collected from a programming environment. We analyze: 1) the earliness of students' work, i.e. when they start working on their course assignments, 2) the number of days students work on course assignments, and 3) the relationship between earliness, the number of days worked, and course outcomes. Our results provide further support for the notion that, on average, students who start working on course assignments early perform slightly better in the course. At the same time, we found that starting early does not necessarily mean that students work on more days, and that starting early and working on many days does not necessarily mean that students get better grades. In addition, some students who start working early on the assignments in the first weeks of the course seem to start delaying when they begin working on assignments as the course progresses, while other students seem to be able to continue starting early throughout the course.
Subject: 516 Educational sciences
113 Computer and information sciences
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