Vasculogenic Mimicry in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma—Time to Take Notice

Show full item record



Permalink

http://hdl.handle.net/10138/333487

Citation

Salem , A & Salo , T 2021 , ' Vasculogenic Mimicry in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma—Time to Take Notice ' , Frontiers in Oral Health , vol. 2 , 666895 . https://doi.org/10.3389/froh.2021.666895

Title: Vasculogenic Mimicry in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma—Time to Take Notice
Author: Salem, Abdelhakim; Salo, Tuula
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Diseases
University of Helsinki, HUSLAB
Date: 2021-03-31
Language: eng
Number of pages: 6
Belongs to series: Frontiers in Oral Health
ISSN: 2673-4842
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/333487
Abstract: Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is a group of common cancers characterized by a swift growth pattern, early metastasis, and dismal 5-year survival rates. Despite the recent advances in cancer management, the multimodality approach is not effective in eradicating HNSCC. Moreover, the clinical response to the antiangiogenic therapy remains considerably limited in HNSCC patients, suggesting that tumour perfusion can take place through other non-angiogenic pathways. Tumour cell-induced angiogenesis is one of the main hallmarks of cancer. However, at the end of the previous millennium, a new paradigm of tumour cell-associated neovascularization has been reported in human melanoma cells. This new phenomenon, which was named “vasculogenic mimicry” or “vascular mimicry” (VM), describes the ability of aggressively growing tumour cells to form perfusable, matrix-rich, vessel-like networks in 3-dimenstional matrices in vitro. Similar matrix-rich VM networks were also identified in tissue samples obtained from cancer patients. To date, myriad studies have reported intriguing features of VM in a wide variety of cancers including HNSCC. We aim in this mini-review to summarize the current evidence regarding the phenomenon of VM in HNSCC—from the available detection protocols and potentially involved mechanisms, to its prognostic value and the present limitations.
Subject: 313 Dentistry
Rights:


Files in this item

Total number of downloads: Loading...

Files Size Format View
Salem_and_Salo_2021.pdf 598.9Kb PDF View/Open

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record