An initiator- and catalyst-free hydrogel coating process for 3D printed medical-grade poly(epsilon-caprolactone)

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http://hdl.handle.net/10138/333932

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Loeblein , J , Lorson , T , Komma , M , Kielholz , T , Windbergs , M , Dalton , P D & Luxenhofer , R 2021 , ' An initiator- and catalyst-free hydrogel coating process for 3D printed medical-grade poly(epsilon-caprolactone) ' , Beilstein Journal of Organic Chemistry , vol. 17 , pp. 2095-2101 . https://doi.org/10.3762/bjoc.17.136

Title: An initiator- and catalyst-free hydrogel coating process for 3D printed medical-grade poly(epsilon-caprolactone)
Author: Loeblein, Jochen; Lorson, Thomas; Komma, Miriam; Kielholz, Tobias; Windbergs, Maike; Dalton, Paul D.; Luxenhofer, Robert
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Helsinki Institute of Sustainability Science (HELSUS)
Date: 2021-08-19
Language: eng
Number of pages: 7
Belongs to series: Beilstein Journal of Organic Chemistry
ISSN: 1860-5397
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/333932
Abstract: Additive manufacturing or 3D printing as an umbrella term for various materials processing methods has distinct advantages over many other processing methods, including the ability to generate highly complex shapes and designs. However, the performance of any produced part not only depends on the material used and its shape, but is also critically dependent on its surface properties. Important features, such as wetting or fouling, critically depend mainly on the immediate surface energy. To gain control over the surface chemistry post-processing modifications are generally necessary, since it' s not a feature of additive manufacturing. Here, we report on the use of initiator and catalyst-free photografting and photopolymerization for the hydrophilic modification of microfiber scaffolds obtained from hydrophobic medical-grade poly(epsilon-caprolactone) via melt-electrowriting. Contact angle measurements and Raman spectroscopy confirms the formation of a more hydrophilic coating of poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate). Apart from surface modification, we also observe bulk polymerization, which is expected for this method, and currently limits the controllability of this procedure.
Subject: additive manufacturing
light-induced polymerization
self-initiated photografting and photopolymerization
surface-initiated polymerization
surface modification
POLYMER BRUSHES
PROTEIN ADSORPTION
ACRYLIC-ACID
POLY(2-OXAZOLINE)
PERFORMANCE
FABRICATION
DESIGN
116 Chemical sciences
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