Collaboration enhances career progression in academic science, especially for female researchers

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dc.contributor.author van der Wal, Jessica E. M.
dc.contributor.author Thorogood, Rose
dc.contributor.author Horrocks, Nicholas P. C.
dc.date.accessioned 2021-09-16T04:58:01Z
dc.date.available 2021-09-16T04:58:01Z
dc.date.issued 2021-09-08
dc.identifier.citation van der Wal , J E M , Thorogood , R & Horrocks , N P C 2021 , ' Collaboration enhances career progression in academic science, especially for female researchers ' , Proceedings of the Royal Society B. Biological Sciences , vol. 288 , no. 1958 , 20210219 . https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2021.0219
dc.identifier.other PURE: 168505084
dc.identifier.other PURE UUID: de086e19-9d75-40c8-9468-80ee16b682be
dc.identifier.other WOS: 000693568800010
dc.identifier.other ORCID: /0000-0001-5010-2177/work/100084435
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10138/334393
dc.description.abstract Collaboration and diversity are increasingly promoted in science. Yet how collaborations influence academic career progression, and whether this differs by gender, remains largely unknown. Here, we use co-authorship ego networks to quantify collaboration behaviour and career progression of a cohort of contributors to biennial International Society of Behavioral Ecology meetings (1992, 1994, 1996). Among this cohort, women were slower and less likely to become a principal investigator (PI; approximated by having at least three last-author publications) and published fewer papers over fewer years (i.e. had shorter academic careers) than men. After adjusting for publication number, women also had fewer collaborators (lower adjusted network size) and published fewer times with each co-author (lower adjusted tie strength), albeit more often with the same group of collaborators (higher adjusted clustering coefficient). Authors with stronger networks were more likely to become a PI, and those with less clustered networks did so more quickly. Women, however, showed a stronger positive relationship with adjusted network size (increased career length) and adjusted tie strength (increased likelihood to become a PI). Finally, early-career network characteristics correlated with career length. Our results suggest that large and varied collaboration networks are positively correlated with career progression, especially for women. en
dc.format.extent 10
dc.language.iso eng
dc.relation.ispartof Proceedings of the Royal Society B. Biological Sciences
dc.rights cc_by
dc.rights.uri info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.subject bibliometrics
dc.subject collaboration networks
dc.subject gender gap
dc.subject academic survival
dc.subject sociality
dc.subject GENDER-DIFFERENCES
dc.subject WOMEN
dc.subject IMPACT
dc.subject REGRESSION
dc.subject ECOLOGY
dc.subject LIFE
dc.subject TIES
dc.subject 5141 Sociology
dc.title Collaboration enhances career progression in academic science, especially for female researchers en
dc.type Article
dc.contributor.organization Helsinki Institute of Life Science HiLIFE, Joint Activities
dc.contributor.organization Organismal and Evolutionary Biology Research Programme
dc.contributor.organization Helsinki Institute of Life Science HiLIFE
dc.contributor.organization Helsinki Institute of Sustainability Science (HELSUS)
dc.contributor.organization Evolution, Sociality & Behaviour
dc.description.reviewstatus Peer reviewed
dc.relation.doi https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2021.0219
dc.relation.issn 0962-8452
dc.rights.accesslevel openAccess
dc.type.version publishedVersion

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