Assessing the vulnerability of breeding bird populations to onshore wind-energy developments in Finland

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http://hdl.handle.net/10138/334772

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Balotari-Chiebao , F , Valkama , J & Byholm , P 2021 , ' Assessing the vulnerability of breeding bird populations to onshore wind-energy developments in Finland ' , Ornis Fennica , vol. 98 , no. 2 , pp. 59-73 . < https://www.ornisfennica.org/pdf/latest/21Balotari-Chiebao.pdf >

Title: Assessing the vulnerability of breeding bird populations to onshore wind-energy developments in Finland
Author: Balotari-Chiebao, Fabio; Valkama, Jari; Byholm, Patrik
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Zoology
University of Helsinki, Organismal and Evolutionary Biology Research Programme
Date: 2021
Language: eng
Number of pages: 15
Belongs to series: Ornis Fennica
ISSN: 0030-5685
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/334772
Abstract: Wind-energy expansion raises concerns over its potential impacts on bird populations. Birds may be affected directly via collision with turbines or indirectly via habitat loss or displacement due to disturbance. Species with long generation times, low reproductive output or high habitat specialisation are more likely to be impacted. Using national-scale breeding bird distributions, we applied a quantitative prioritisation method to assess the vulnerability of species to onshore wind-energy developments in Finland. We assessed 214 species that regularly breed in the country. Each species was assigned a priority score based on a combination of life-history traits, habitat specialisation, exposure to wind energy and conservation status. We found that the priority scores varied markedly between species, allowing a distinction between a minority of high-ranked species and a majority of low-ranked species. High-ranked species included terns (e.g., Sternula albifrons), raptors (e.g., Aquila chrysaetos), gulls (e.g., Larus fuscus), some forest-dwelling passerines (e.g., Poecile montanus) and ducks (e.g., Aythya ferina). Low-ranked species included woodpeckers (e.g., Picus canus) and many passerines. Our results indicate that the priority species are not limited to the more highly regarded large raptors, and that wind-energy impact assessments need to pay special attention to high-ranked species inhabiting coastal areas.
Subject: FARMS
IMPACTS
MORTALITY
BARRIERS
TURBINES
SUCCESS
EAGLES
1181 Ecology, evolutionary biology
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